Black Coal Miners in America: Race, Class, and Community Conflict, 1780-1980

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University Press of Kentucky, Jan 1, 1987 - Social Science - 239 pages
From the early day of mining in colonial Virginia and Maryland up to the time of World War II, blacks were an important part of the labor force in the coal industry. Yet in this, as in other enterprises, their role has heretofore been largely ignored. Now Roland L. Lewis redresses the balance in this comprehensive history of black coal miners in America. The experience of blacks in the industry has varied widely over time and by region, and the approach of this study is therefore more comparative than chronological. Its aim is to define the patterns of race relations that prevailed among the m.
 

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Black coal miners in America: race, class, and community conflict, 1780-1980

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Black workers have been an important part of the coal-mining industry from colonial times until the decline of the industry in the 1950s, but this part of American labor and industrial history has up ... Read full review

Contents

Slavery
3
Convict Labor
13
The Social Equality Wedge in Alabama 18801908
39
Resurgence of the UMWA in Alabama 19201940
58
Job Control Racial Conflict
79
Race Class Community the UMWA in the North
99
Judicious Mixture in Central Appalachia 18801920
121
The Fruits of Judicious Mixture 19101932
143
Demise of the Black Miner
167
Employment of Blacks in the Bituminous
191
Primary Sources
227
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