Maus, Volume 1

Front Cover
7 Reviews
A story of a Jewish survivor of Hitler's Europe and his son, a cartoonist who tries to come to terms with his father's story and history itself.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
1
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
0

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Spiegelman, the author, is a baby-boomer, and both his parents were in Nazi concentration camps. Unfortunately, his mother committed suicide before he had a chance to interview her. We never do find out really why she killed herself, though there are hints that Vladek (Art's father) was too hard on her (psychologically) or that she felt intolerable guilt about the death of her first son as a young boy. This was the author's brother, Richieu. It seems he also died at the hands of the Nazis, though it is not entirely clear that he died this way.
The author did interview his father toward the end of his father's life. And what a story he came up with. A true survivor's tale of what he saw and endured at Auschwitz, while his wife, the author's mother, was most of the time in a separate concentration camp.
Art has cameo appearances by himself, with his wife, and interviewing his father, throughout the story. He visits weekly an old friend of his father's, also a survivor of the camps. The old friend tells him that perhaps he feels some guilt about what his parents had to go through. We all feel guilt, he continues, and the guilt may not end for several generations more.
A lot has changed since those times, but this graphic novel gives a good idea of what transpired in these concentration camps, at least from Vladek's viewpoint. What occurs to me is how cheap Jewish life was considered in those days, and probably not only in those days.
The moral: Yet what was done to the Jews is done to all of us, Jewish or not. The outcome is that all life is cheapened. We may have today enough food, shelter, clothing, and luxuries undreamed of then, but life is still a ghetto, because man hates himself and projects it onto others. Or something like that. Women are different, thank goodness. Unfortunately, they seem to be growing more like men, the wrong direction, I would estimate.
This book will definitely make you think.
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

loved it

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
12
Section 3
13
Section 4
17
Section 5
20
Section 6
33
Section 7
34
Section 8
38
Section 25
81
Section 26
82
Section 27
83
Section 28
84
Section 29
89
Section 30
92
Section 31
98
Section 32
99

Section 9
43
Section 10
44
Section 11
46
Section 12
48
Section 13
51
Section 14
52
Section 15
58
Section 16
59
Section 17
61
Section 18
62
Section 19
63
Section 20
64
Section 21
73
Section 22
76
Section 23
77
Section 24
79
Section 33
100
Section 34
102
Section 35
105
Section 36
119
Section 37
127
Section 38
130
Section 39
132
Section 40
138
Section 41
141
Section 42
143
Section 43
146
Section 44
154
Section 45
155
Section 46
156
Section 47
159

Other editions - View all

References to this book

All Book Search results »