The Jew of Malta

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Broadview Press, Dec 2, 2011 - Drama - 290 pages
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First performed by Shakespeare’s rivals in the 1590s, Christopher Marlowe’s The Jew of Malta was a trend-setting, innovative play whose black comedy and final tragic irony illuminate the darker regions of the Elizabethan cultural imagination. Although Jews were banished from England in 1291, the Jew in the form of Barabas, the play’s protagonist, returns on the stage to embody and to challenge the dramatic and cultural anti-Semitic stereotypes out of which he is constructed. The result is a theatrically sophisticated but deeply unsettling play whose rich cultural significance extends beyond the early modern period to the present day.

The introduction and historical documents in this edition provide a rich context for the world of the play’s composition and production, including materials on Jewishness and anti-Semitism, the political struggles over Malta, and Christopher Marlowe’s personal and political reputation.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - valzi - LibraryThing

Does not compare to Shakespeare's much better rewrite, _The Merchant of Venice_. Marlowe's is simple and a bit vulgar without using either quality to its advantage. Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgements
7
Introduction
9
A Brief Chronology of His Life and Times
41
A Note on the Text
45
The Jew of Malta
47
Jewishness in Marlowes England
191
Rhodes Malta and EuropeanOttoman Relations
227
Machiavellianism
245
Marlowes Reputation
265
Works Cited and Further Reading
279
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Mathew R. Martin is Full Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at Brock University.

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