The Farthest Shore

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Simon and Schuster, 1972 - Juvenile Fiction - 223 pages
18 Reviews
When the prince of Enlad declares the wizards have forgotten their spells, Ged sets out to test the ancient prophecies of Earthsea.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - NineLarks - LibraryThing

Magic seems to be disappearing from the world. When no one else knows what to do, Ged takes a young prince to seek the heart of the problem. But everywhere they go, there is darkness. This was ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CherieDooryard - LibraryThing

Meh. Is that a sufficient review? Meh. Better than the first, worse than the second. More sailing about here and there, too much Ged-the-Wise chatter with deep meanings hinted at but never fully ... Read full review

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Contents

The Rowan Tree
3
The Masters of Roke
16
Hon Town
36
Magelight
63
Sea Dreams
77
Lorbanery
87
The Madman
106
The Children of the Open Sea
124
0rz Embar
142
The Dragons Run
165
Selidor
178
The Dry Land
194
SVowe o P
213
Copyright

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About the author (1972)

Ursula K. Le Guin is one of the most distinguished fantasy and science fiction writers of all time. She has won numerous awards for her work, including the Nebula Award, the Hugo Award, the National Book Award, and the Newbery Honor. She lives in Portland, Oregon. Visit her online at UrsulaKLeguin.com.

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