Shipsheds of the Ancient Mediterranean

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jan 9, 2014 - History - 617 pages
0 Reviews
This is the first detailed and comprehensive study of the shipshed complexes which housed the great navies of the Greco-Roman world, including Athens and Carthage. These complexes represented some of the largest and most expensive building projects of antiquity, and the volume provides a comprehensive survey of the archaeological and literary evidence. It explains how the buildings were carefully designed to keep warships dry and out of reach of shipworm, whilst enabling them to be launched quickly, easily and safely when required. It also serves as a handbook for archaeologists who may excavate such buildings, which are often difficult to identify and interpret. The analytical chapters are complemented by a full and detailed catalogue of known sheds, with plans for all the major sites specially drawn for easy comparison. The book thus provides an indispensable guide for all those interested in these buildings and in the maritime infrastructure of the ancient world.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction David Blackman and Boris Rankov
3
The upper ends of some 0fthe
7
Classical and Hellenistic sheds David Blackman
16
Roman shipsheds Boris Rankov
30
Warships on a fresco found in a house
38
Zea a case study
55
Plan reconstruction of a tenslipway Phase
58
Ships and shipsheds Boris Rankov
76
Corcyra KalliopiBaika
319
Dor KalliopiBaika
335
Eulimna KalliopiBaika
340
Kition Iudith McKenzie
349
114
351
1o Kos KalliopiBaika
362
Loryma Henrik Gerding
372
Massalia Judith McKenzie
376

The Olympias trireme reconstruction at sea
77
Reconstruction drawing ofa hemiolia c 300
84
Slipping and launching Boris Rankov
102
Ramps and substructures David Blackmarz
124
Roofs and superstructures Henrik Gerdirzg
141
stoa 0f
146
89
154
106
160
The topography of shipshed complexes and naval dockyards
185
107
221
The fortification of shipsheds and naval arsenals Kalliopi Baika
231
not just ship garages David Blackmarz
254
Guide and preface to the catalogue adith McKenzie
263
Abdera Kalliopi Baika
270
Aigila Kalliopi Baika
277
Aigina Henrik Gerding
284
Apollonia KalliopiBaika
294
Carthage Henrik Gerding
307
126
383
Matalon Henrik Gerding
389
Naxos in Sicily Maria Costanza Lentini and David Blackman with ari Pakkanen
393
Oiniadai Henrik Gerding
410
Piraeus Boris Rankov
420
150
436
Poiessa KalliopiBaika
489
Ptolemais KalliopiBaika
494
RhithymnaArsinoe KalliopiBaika
501
Rhodes Henrik Gerding
509
Setaea KalliopiBaika
518
Sounion KalliopiBaika
525
Syracuse Henrik Gerding
535
Thasos KalliopiBaika
542
Beirut Halicarnassus Kirrha Aghios Demetrios Island by Panos Valavanis Mallorca Marea Mykale Tersane Bay
555
Carteia Dead Sea Qasr elYahudKhirbet Mazin Elaia by Stefan Feuser and Felix Pirson Geraistos Hanieh Island Itanos by Kalliopi Baika Kalaureia by I...
577
Anaphlystos by Kalliopi Baika Carcura Herakleion
583
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2014)

David Blackman has been carrying out and publishing research on ancient harbours for over forty years; as a postgraduate student he provided an analysis of the then known remains of ancient shipsheds (published in 1968 in Morrison and Williams' Greek Oared Ships), which were one key factor in the design of the Olympias trireme reconstruction. The present book is a culmination of that work. In 1997 he became Director of the British School at Athens, and has been based in Oxford since 2002.

Boris Rankov is Professor of Ancient History at Royal Holloway, University of London. In 1987 he recruited the first trials crew of 170 rowers to operate the Olympias trireme reconstruction, and was one of the rowing masters on the ship in 1988, 1990 and 1992. In 1996, he succeeded John Morrison as Chairman of the Trireme Trust, and subsequently co-authored the second edition of The Athenian Trireme (Cambridge University Press, 2000). Alongside work on the Roman army and its epigraphy, ancient oared ships have remained a focus of his research and publication, including Trireme Olympias: The Final Report (2012) and the present volume.

Kalliopi Baika has a PhD from the University of Paris I-Panthéon-Sorbonne. She has worked at Royal Holloway, University of London, has been Visiting Lecturer in Maritime Archaeology at the University of the Peloponnese and is now a maritime archaeologist at the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities in the Hellenic Ministry of Culture. She specialises in Greek harbour archaeology and coastal geoarchaeology in the Aegean and Mediterranean.

Henrik Gerding has a PhD in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History from Lund University. He has worked at Royal Holloway, University of London and Uppsala University and is now Senior Lecturer in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History at Lund University. His research has been mainly on ancient architecture, and his published works include a monograph on the tomb of Caecilia Metella outside Rome.

Jari Pakkanen is Senior Lecturer in Classical Archaeology at Royal Holloway, University of London and has been a Co-Director of the Project. He specialises in Greek architecture, and from summer 2013 is the Director of the Finnish Institute at Athens.

Bibliographic information