Daughters of the State: A Social Portrait of the First Reform School for Girls in North America, 1856-1905

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MIT Press, 1985 - Social Science - 206 pages
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A rich and fascinating study of education, social reform, and women's history,Daughters of the State explores the lives of young girls who came to the State Industrial School forGirls in Lancaster, Massachusetts during its first fifty years.Brenzel skillfully integrates thecomplex lines of nineteenth-century social thought and policies formed around issues of work, sexroles, schooling, and sexuality that have carried through to this century. In the school'shandwritten case histories and legislative reports, she uncovers institutional mores and biasestoward the young and the poor and especially toward women. Brenzel also reveals the plight of theparents who were forced by their circumstances to condemn their children to such institutions in thehope of improving their futures.Barbara Brenzel is Assistant Professor of Education and DepartmentChair at Wellesley College. Daughters of the State is an MIT-Harvard joint Center for Urban StudiesBook.

 

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Contents

Citizens and Strangers in NineteenthCentury
9
2
27
3
42
Its Opening Year
65
5
90
The Girls of Lancaster in Its First Fifty
107
The Twilight of a Dream
136
8
160
Notes
169
Bibliography
185
Publications of the Joint Center for Urban Studies
199
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About the author (1985)

Barbara Brenzel is Assistant Professor of Education and Department Chair at Wellesley College.

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