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Books Books 1 - 7 of 7 on There is commonly a strong resemblance, owing to inheritance, between the dispositions....
" There is commonly a strong resemblance, owing to inheritance, between the dispositions of the child and its parents. They are able to understand the ways of one another more intimately than is possible to persons not of the same blood, and the child instinctively... "
Inquiries Into Human Faculty and Its Development - Page 242
by Sir Francis Galton - 1883 - 387 pages
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The Journal of the Anthropological institute

Royal anthropological institute - 1876
...There is commonly a strong resemblance, owing to inheritance, between the dispositions of the child and its parents. They are able to understand the ways...sense of the word ', that is to say, it is evoked earlier than it would otherwise have been. On these grounds, I ascribe the persistence of habits that...
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Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain ..., Volume 5

Anthropology - 1876
...There is commonly a strong resemblance, owing to inheritance, between the dispositions of the child and its parents. They are able to understand the ways...true sense of the word ; that is to say, it is evoked earlier than it would otherwise have been. On these grounds, I ascribe the persistence of habits that...
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Physiology of Bodily Exercise

Fernand Lagrange - Exercise - 1889 - 395 pages
...causes increased action of the heart-muscle. Usually, in fact, this organ does become hypertrophicd in the true sense of the word, that is to say it becomes thicker, heavier, with stronger walls and able to propel the blood more vigorously. True or...
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The Monist, Volume 4

Paul Carus - Philosophy - 1894
...only is geometrical space isogenous, as we first believed real space was, but it is also homogeneous in the true sense of the word : that is to say, it has the capacity of receiving similar bodies, or bodies of the same form but different dimensions....
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Making the Most of the Children

Daniel Wolford La Rue - Child development - 1916 - 135 pages
...At home, heredity and environment reenforce each other as nowhere else. As Francis Galton puts it: " Those teachings that conform to the natural aptitudes...that is to say, it is evoked, not formed by them."* " My son, you eat like a pig," said a father, in reproof. Then, to drive the lesson, home, he asked,...
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Balzac: Old Goriot

David Bellos - Literary Criticism - 1987 - 103 pages
...imaginary world is not the reader Balzac wanted for Old Goriot. He admits that his text is not dramatic 'in the true sense of the word', that is to say it is not actually a play; but he insists that it is not novelistic in the conventional sense either. Balzac...
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the life letters and labours of francis galton

...child and its parents. They are able to understand the ways of one another more intimately than ís possible to persons not of the same blood, and the...true sense of the word ; that is to say, it is evoked earlier than it would otherwise have been. On these grounds I ascribe the persistence of habits that...
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