A Treatise on Water-works for Conveying and Distributing Supplies of Water: With Tables and Examples

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Hilliard, Gray and Company, 1835 - Water-supply engineering - 242 pages
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Page 73 - ... the former state of the Works, to have commanded. As far, therefore, as regards the description and quantity of Water supplied to the cities of London and Westminster, it appears that more than half the consumption is derived from the Thames, and that it is in such abundance as not only to supply all necessary demands upon ordinary and extraordinary occasions, but that a proportion is constantly suffered to run to waste, by which the cleansing of the drains of houses and of the common sewers...
Page 233 - A few years before, an attempt was made to dig a well a few rods (16^ feet) to the east near the sea. Having dug about 60 feet in a body of clay without finding water, preparation was made in the usual way for boring ; and, after passing about 40 feet in the same body of clay, the augur was impeded by stone. A few strokes with a drill broke through the slate covering, and the water gushed out with such rapidity and force, that the workmen with difficulty were saved from death.
Page 79 - D; that is, equal to the velocity which a heavy body would acquire in falling through the altitude er; and all the plates of water in the tube mnrs will...
Page 188 - After the pond was made water tight, with a drain through the bank to the well, the bottom was covered with coarse gravel, in which drains were built without any cement between the joints of the bricks ; they were covered with coarse gravel, and then with finer gravel, with coarse sand and finer sand, until the strata of gravel and sand were each two feet thick, both gravel and sand . having been selected with care, and well washed. The reservoirs were each...
Page 74 - ... the want of proper reservoirs for preserving a head of water upon the mains when the engines are not working. On these occasions much time is often lost in sending to the engine of the district, and if the steam be not up, and the fire low, further and fatal delay sometimes occurs. In reference to the total amount of the quantity of Water required for the daily supply of the inhabitants of the Metropolis, and for the use of the various manufactories requiring it, it appears to be about 29,000,000...
Page 74 - We have inquired into the causes of this, and are induced to refer it to the want of proper reservoirs for preserving a head of water upon the mains when the engines are not working. On these occasions much time is often lost in sending to the engine of the district, and if the steam be not up, and the fire low, further and fatal delay sometimes occurs. In reference to the total amount of the quantity of Water required for the daily supply of the inhabitants of the Metropolis...
Page 188 - ... cubic feet of water every twenty-four hours ; and the water was remarkably pure and limpid after it had passed the bed. The silt which was stopped on the bed was regularly cleaned off with a small portion of the sand every fourteen days ^ the principle of the action depends upon the strata of filtering material being finest at the top, the interstices being more minute in the fine sand than the strata below, and the silt, as its progress is arrested, (while the water passes from it) renders the...
Page 189 - ... more minute, and the bed generally produces better water when it is pretty well covered with silt than at any other time. The silt has never been found to penetrate into the sand more than three inches, the greatest portion always being stopped within the top half inch of the sand, and in cleaning the silt off, it has never been found necessary to scrape any more of the sand off with the silt than the first half inch depth, and sometimes only half that depth was removed. The small air pipes from...
Page 82 - Rule. — Measure the depth from the surface of the water to the centre of the orifice of discharge, in feet, and extract the square root of that depth ; multiply it by...
Page 73 - ... of houses and buildings receiving this supply amounts to about 144,000. The water is of course very unequally distributed, the average consumption in each house being apparently greatest in the district supplied by the Grand Junction Company, where it amounts to about 363 gallons daily per house. Taking the average of the whole supply, the daily consumption of each house is about 180 gallons. Of this water, more than one half of which is derived from the Thames, a large portion is 'delivered...

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