Muscovy and the Mongols: Cross-Cultural Influences on the Steppe Frontier, 1304-1589

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 20, 2002 - History - 348 pages
3 Reviews
The importance of the Mongols' impact on the Rus lands has been recognised by many scholars, but its precise nature and extent is very contentious. While diverse opinions exist on the origins and development of Muscovy, the author argues that no society arises ex nihilo and that Muscovy is no exception. Donald Ostrowski considers here the outside origins and influences, as well as indigenous origins and development, in order that the reader may gain a clearer understanding of Muscovy as a political entity, its political institutions and political culture. He shows that during the early period of Muscovy (1304-1448) the ecclesiastical and secular institutions were affected by two different outside influences, Byzantium and the Qipchaq Khanate, respectively. In considering these outside influences, he has set out to study Muscovy as an integral and important part of world history.
 

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Contents

understanding Muscovy
1
Mongol influence whats what and whats not
29
Setting the scene
31
Administration political institutions and the military
36
Seclusion of women
64
Oriental despotism
85
Economic oppression
108
Development of an antiTatar ideology in the Muscovite Church
133
Fashioning the khan into a basileus
164
Byzantine political thought and Muscovy
199
Third Rome delimiting the rulers power and authority
219
The myth of the Tatar yoke
244
types of crosscultural influences
249
Glossary
251
Chronology to 1589
254
Bibliography
266

Defining ideology
135
AntiTatar interpolations in the Rus chronicles
144

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China Marches West
Peter C Perdue
Limited preview - 2005
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