Catholic Church and Christian State, essays. Transl

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Contents

The power of the Church also has limits
21
The State has nothing to fear from the Church but vice vend since the Reformation
22
J The Church especially threatened from two quarters
25
Hindrances to the carrying out of the Churchs principles
28
The Declarations of the Pofes give no Cause fob Apprehension 1 Nothing defined as to the power of the Church over temporal matters
30
The Bull Unam sanctam
31
Further objections
32
Approbation of the Bull by the Fifth Council of the Lateran
36
Utterances on ecclesiastical immunities
38
The Bull Cum ex apostolatus officio
41
Further objections
44
The Bull Cum quorumdam
45
The Bull In coena Domini
47
Other Bulls also irrelevant
51
Canons in this Schema on the relation of Church and State
53
The three last chapters of the Schema
55
Confusion of ideas among our opponents
56
The Popes do not interfere in the internal affairs of nations
59
They well recognise the difference between mediaeval and modern times
62
Declaration of Pius IX on 20th July 1871
64
The Church limited to the purely ecclesiastical domain and even there in many ways not free
65
Nominations to bishoprics and abbacies
66
Concessions to rulers
70
Concordats
71
Rome maintains their inviolability
75
Rome unchanging yet paying due regard to changes of times and circumstances
77
ESSAY II
78
questions of faith or morals
80
the assistance of the Holy Ghost
82
Its connection with the infallibility of the united episcopate
84
Tokens and limits of an excathedra definition
85
Infallibility in no wise irrational
87
St Vincentius of Lerins
91
Testimony of the first six centuries
93
St Irenseus
95
The formula of Hormisdas
99
I Faith and obedience
103
The second Council of Lyons and the Council of Florence
104
The Councils of Constance and Basle
107
Prohibition of appeal from the Pope
109
Political Effect of the Dogma B1CT PAGE 1 That the dogma injures civil allegiance was asserted by the Jansenists and the opponents of the Vatican ...
113
Conduces rather to the peace and prosperity of the State
116
Why the doctrine not long ago recognised as dangerous 1
118
The change not in the Church but in the State
119
ESSAY III
121
Conception
122
Their grounds and principles throughout heretical Protestant
123
Likewise their proceedings Comparison with those of the Arians
126
Comparison with those of the Donatists
128
All heretics reproach the Church with being corrupt
130
Connection with Jansenism
132
Their want of unity in contrast with the unity of the Church
134
Pretended want of freedom of the Council
137
Letters on the Council and Fried richs Journal
139
Alleged pressure by the Pope and the Curia
140
Right of definition
143
Order of business
144
Lay diplomacy
147
Charges against the Bishops of the majority
148
Composition of the Council
151
Principle of majority
152
Representation and consent of individual Churohes
155
Theologians and public opinion
157
A new and freer1 Council
158
Dollingers proposal
160
Pretended warfare of the Church against the State
161
Excommunication
162
The Council a test of States
163
The heathen State and State omnipotence
165
SECT PAl
168
How par Episcopal Authority is derived
174
Formula of preconisation
181
The appointment of bishops
188
Restriction upon the power of the Pope
197
ESSAY V
205
SSCT PAGE 1 Differences in the propositions of the Syllabus and in ecclesias tical censures
206
Has the Syllabus dogmatic force?
207
Illustrations
210
The Propositions of the Syllabus 1 Prop 118 7779
213
Independence of the Church as a perfect society
214
State interference
216
Indirect negative power in religious matters
217
The Placet
218
Appeal from a spiritual to a temporal judge
220
Power of the Church over temporal matters
222
Immunities
224
Instruction and education
226
Princes Civil and ecclesiastical law Ordination vows
227
Marriage
232
The family Limits of State authority
235
Divergence of civil laws from ecclesiastical
237
1416 Nonintervention
239
Revolution
242
Sovereignty of the people
244
Practical materialism
246
Errors of modern society
250
Folly of the conclusions wrongly drawn from the Syllabus
252
ESSAY VI
254
The Church in the Germanic kingdoms
255
SECT PAOK 3 Restriction of the royal power
256
The first duties of a king those towards God
258
The oath of kings
259
Their coronation and anointing
261
Public affairs conducted by him
279
The Pope the refuge of all
280
Legislation of the Popes Laws upon usury
281
The Popes active in the interests of princes
285
Their goverument
287
Their temporal power not inconsistent with the spirit of the Gospel
289
Their power developed naturally
292
Excommunication and its Consequences in the Middle Ages 1 Temporal effects of public penance and of excommunication
293
Ecclesiastical right of sanctuary and its modifications
295
Later Concordats
297
Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction exercised by the Popes
339
The King of Leon
355
Titles of honour and intercession with the Popes
362
The Pope as protector of kingdoms
368
Resistance of individual princes
374
POPE GREGORY VII
380
The Pope unconnected with the election of the opposition king
386
With reference to the dispensation of the oath of allegiance
393
No unfairness in Gregory
399
SECT PAOK 1 Feudal suzerainty over single kingdoms
401
Hungary and Poland
402
Bohemia
404
Denmark
405
Spain
406
Corsica and Sardinia
407
Various relations of single States towards the Holy See
408
Gregorys declaration that Peter was set as a prince over all the kingdoms of the earth
409
It is false that Gregory taught that the Pope could take and dispose as he would of kingdoms and of the Possessions of private Persons 1 Gregorys wo...
410
Personal boliDess of Popes
412
Alleged fruitlessness of his conflicts
415
Their result
417
CONTENTS
ESSAY IX
1
Exclusion from public offices
2
From military service Exceptions
3
Intercourse with the excommunicated
4
Severity of discipline mitigated in some points
5
In others increased
6
Kings also liable to excommunication
7
Release from the oath of allegiance
8
Can the Church dispense oaths?
9
The fallibilist doctrine when new was only tolerated and often
10
Examples
11
Principles relating to dispensation from oaths
12
More recent times
13
Deposing rare
14
The eleventh Ecumenical Council
15
lfi The first Council of Lyons 17 Councils of Constance and Basle
17
Councils pass the same sentences
18
Objections
19
His excommunication 20
20
Answers as Popes 2X
21
His peace with them rejected by the Pope 22
22
Fredericks hypocrisy and contradictions 24
24
Peace of San Germano 26
26
Violation of treaties and conduct in Italy 27
27
Dissolution of the oath of allegiance 31
31
Fredericks war against the Pope 33
33
The Council prevented 11 Louis 1X of France 36
36
Council of Lyons 1245 39
39
Fredericks crimes 41
41
Louis declared to have forfeited the empire 55
55
From Charles IV to Charles V 61
61
Controversy between them 68
68
ESSAY XVI
69
Papal Fiefs out of Italy
81
Magna Charta 88
88
The losses of Rome in land and power 94
94
disapproved 110
110
299
120
303
219
305
272
THE FUNlSHMEXT OF HERESY AND THE INQUISITION Part I The Punishment of Heresy 1 2 Imperial laws before the sixth century 801
301
St Augustine 304
304
Other Fathers 306
306
307
307
Punishment of death 308
308
309
309
Proceedings up to Lucius III 311
311
Lucius III 312
312
Innocent III 313
313
Synod of Avignon 314
314
Complaints against Innocent III 315
315
Laws of Frederick II against heretics 31G 14 Enactments in France 317
317
Synod of Toulouse 318
318
Innocent IV 319
319
6 Heresy and high treason Mode of procedure 320
320
Further development of the Inquisition 325
325
Heretics of the thirteenth century 327
327
Crimes of the Albigenees 328
328
The parable of the wheat and the cockle 330
330
Canonisation of Peter Arbues 331
331
Testimony in favour of the inquisitors 332
332
Estimate of the Inquisition 336
336
The Spanish State Inquisition 337
337
Magic and witcheraft 339
339
Are trials for witcheraft to be imputed to the Popes? 342
342
Injustice toward the Popes 345
345
311
392
313
419
323
422
332
429

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Popular passages

Page 129 - All nations whom thou hast made shall come and worship before thee, O LORD; and shall glorify thy name.
Page 407 - See, I have this day set thee over the nations and over the kingdoms, to root out, and to pull down, and to destroy, and to throw down, to build, and to plant.
Page 78 - ... of all Christians, by virtue of his supreme Apostolic authority, he defines a doctrine regarding faith or morals to be held by the universal Church, by the divine assistance promised to him in blessed Peter, is possessed of that infallibility with which the divine Redeemer willed that his Church should be endowed for defining doctrine regarding faith or morals; and that therefore such definitions of the Roman Pontiff are irreformable of themselves, and not from the consent of the Church.
Page 128 - Desire of me, and I shall give thee the heathen for thine inheritance, and the utmost parts of the earth for thy possession.
Page 99 - Desiring, therefore, not to be in the least degree separated from the faith and doctrine of that See, we hope that we may deserve to be in the one communion, which the Apostolic See preaches, in which is the entire and true solidity of the Christian religion.
Page 226 - The entire direction of public schools, in which the youth of Christian states are educated, except ( to a certain extent ) in the case of episcopal seminaries, may and must appertain to the civil power, and belong to it so far that no other authority whatsoever shall be recognized as having any right to interfere in the discipline of the schools, the arrangement of the studies, the taking of degrees, or the choice and approval of the teachers.
Page 104 - ... the Holy Roman Church enjoys supreme and full Primacy and preeminence over the whole Catholic Church, which it truly and humbly acknowledges that it has received with the plenitude of power from our Lord Himself in the person of blessed Peter, Prince or Head of the Apostles, whose successor the Roman Pontiff is; and as the Apostolic See is bound before all others to defend the truth of faith, so also if any questions regarding faith shall arise, they must be defined by its judgment.
Page 78 - ... to be held by the universal Church, is, by the divine assistance promised to him in Blessed Peter, possessed of that infallibility with which the Divine Redeemer willed that His Church should be endowed in defining doctrine regarding faith or morals ; and that therefore such definitions of the Roman Pontiff are of themselves, and not from the consent of the Church, irreformable.
Page 387 - For do I now persuade men, or God? or do I seek to please men ? for if I yet pleased men. I should not be the servant of Christ.
Page 251 - For we have not here a lasting city, but we seek one that is to come.

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