Journal of a Residence at the Cape of Good Hope: With Excursions Into the Interior, and Notes on the Natural History, and the Native Tribes

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John Murray, 1848 - Cape of Good Hope (South Africa) - 297 pages
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Page 157 - ... auspicious circumstances, when, in 1838, Sir George Napier, then governor of the Cape, visited the eastern frontier ; though even at that time, Macomo was said to have been " excessively addicted to drink." " The celebrated chiefs, Macomo and Tyali, who took the most prominent part in the late Kaffir war, dined with us at Mr. Stretch's, and behaved like gentlemen, seeming quite accustomed to European habits, and perfectly at their ease. We had much conversation with them by means of an interpreter....
Page 195 - State. council that these shall be set at liberty on the 1st of December, the same as in the Colony. The emigrants do not seem to have the slightest idea of entering into any slave trade whatever, and are even offended at a question on the subject being put to them. They say, " We are not averse to the emancipation of the slave — the colonists never introduced the slave trade, the European Government forced it upon us — what we complain of is, that our slaves have been emancipated by England...
Page 269 - To form good citizens and men, by instructing them in the relations of social and civil life : — and to fit them for a higher state of existence, by teaching them those which connect them with their Maker and Redeemer.
Page 269 - To these, which constitute the chief scope of every sound System of Public Instruction, his Excellency has to add one of paramount importance in this Colony, viz. to render its Educational Establishments effective in diffusing a correct knowledge of the English language among all ranks of the people.
Page 165 - The Hottentots are mostly of small stature ; the majority of those in the Cape corps (at least of the new levies) are under five feet high, and they are possessed of very little muscular strength. Their hands and feet are small and delicate ; in which particular they differ very remarkably from the Negroes. The number of genuine Hottentots within the colony at the present day is small compared with that of the mixed breeds, or Bastaards, as they are called, in whom the blood of the aboriginal race...
Page 195 - December, the same as in the colony. The emigrants do not seem to have the slightest idea of entering into any slave trade whatever, and are even offended at a question on the subject being put to them. They say, " We are not averse to the emancipation of the slave, — the colonists never introduced the slave trade, the European governments forced it upon us, — what we complain of is, that our slaves have been emancipated by England under a promise of full compensation, whereas, we have scarcely...
Page 197 - Town is a small place, consisting of little more than a single row of houses stretching along the shore of the bay, and backed by steep barren stony hills. It is rather more respectable in appearance than Port Elizabeth, but has the usual disagreeable accompaniments of a seaport; and the coast on which it is situated is deplorably barren ; between the sands of the shore and the naked stony hills there is no space left for cultivation, and there is scarcely a tinge of green in the landscape.
Page 53 - It is exposed to great heat, in consequence of its situation, facing the noon-day sun, and immediately backed by naked mountains.
Page 125 - ... miles, over a hilly country, covered for the most part with low but thick " bush ;" the soil a hard clay. Though the general appearance of this kind of country is in some degree monotonous, yet its rich and singular vegetation is very attractive to the eye of a naturalist. The strange, stiff, gaunt forms of the leafless euphorbias, which suggest the idea of some monstrous Indian idols ; the aloes, with their spear-like leaves, and tall scarlet spikes ; the pale green foliage of the spekboom...
Page 94 - The soil of all this tract is a very hard ironstone gravel ; the road execrably rugged, in spite of the goodness of the material, for no care whatever is bestowed on it, and as it is generally on a slope, the rain water from the higher ground cuts furrows across it, which are deepened by every succeeding winter. The jolting occasioned by travelling in a horse waggon on such roads, is beyond all description ; I despair of giving an idea of it to those who have never experienced the like ; suffice...

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