Indian Antiquities: Or, Dissertations, Relative to the Ancient Geographic Divisions, the Pure System of Primeval Theology ... of Hindostan: Compared, Throughout, with the Religion, Laws, Government, and Literature of Persia, Egypt, and Greece, the Whole Intended as Introductory to the History of Hindostan Upon a Comprehensive Scale, Volume 7

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T. Maurice, 1806 - India
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Page 105 - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists...
Page 234 - And this is the offering which ye shall take of them; gold, and silver, and brass, and blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine linen, and goats...
Page 257 - Where were white, green, and blue hangings, fastened with cords of fine linen and purple, to silver rings, and pillars of marble : the beds were , of gdld and silver, upon a pavement of red and blue, and white, and black marble.
Page 162 - The flesh of the antelope and the rhinoceros give my beloved" (ie the goddess KALI,) " delight for five hundred years. " By a human sacrifice, attended by the forms laid down, DEVI is pleased one thousand years ; and by a sacrifice of three men, one hundred thousand years.
Page 326 - And it came to pass, that in the morning, behold, it was Leah : and he said to Laban, What is this thou hast done unto me ? did not I serve with thee for Rachel ? wherefore then hast thou beguiled me ? 26 And Laban said, It must not be so done in * our country, to give the younger before the firstborn.
Page 276 - And thou shalt set in it settings of stones, even four rows of stones: the first row shall be a sardius, a topaz, and a carbuncle: this shall be the first row. 18 And the second row shall be an emerald, a sapphire, and a diamond.
Page 277 - Six of their names on one stone, and the other six names of the rest on the other stone, according to their birth.
Page 341 - Let him choose for his wife a girl, whose form has no defect ; who has an agreeable name ; who walks gracefully like a phenicopteros, or like a young elephant ; whose hair and teeth are moderate respectively in quantity and in size ; whose body has exquisite softness.
Page 351 - A mansion infested by age and by sorrow ; the seat of malady, harassed with pains, haunted with the quality of darkness, and incapable of standing long; such a mansion of the vital soul, let its occupier always cheerfully quit.
Page 351 - A mansion with bones for its rafters and beams ; with nerves and tendons for cords ; with muscles and blood for mortar ; with skin for its outward covering; filled with no sweet perfume, but loaded with...

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