Precarious Japan (Google eBook)

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Duke University Press, Nov 11, 2013 - Social Science - 256 pages
6 Reviews
In an era of irregular labor, nagging recession, nuclear contamination, and a shrinking population, Japan is facing precarious times. How the Japanese experience insecurity in their daily and social lives is the subject of Precarious Japan. Tacking between the structural conditions of socioeconomic life and the ways people are making do, or not, Anne Allison chronicles the loss of home affecting many Japanese, not only in the literal sense but also in the figurative sense of not belonging. Until the collapse of Japan's economic bubble in 1991, lifelong employment and a secure income were within reach of most Japanese men, enabling them to maintain their families in a comfortable middle-class lifestyle. Now, as fewer and fewer people are able to find full-time work, hope turns to hopelessness and security gives way to a pervasive unease. Yet some Japanese are getting by, partly by reconceiving notions of home, family, and togetherness.
  

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Review: Precarious Japan

User Review  - Liujayn Al-matarneh - Goodreads

I take a long time to finish it but I don't regret it its open a window for me to the Japanese cultures Read full review

Review: Precarious Japan

User Review  - Goodreads

I take a long time to finish it but I don't regret it its open a window for me to the Japanese cultures Read full review

Contents

Chapter 1 Pain of Life
1
Chapter 2 From Lifelong to Liquid Japan
21
Poverty Precarity Youth
43
Chapter 4 Home and Hope
77
Chapter 5 The Social BodyIn Life and Death
122
Chapter 6 Cultivating Fields from the Edges
166
Chapter 7 In the Mud
180
Notes
207
References
219
Index
231
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Anne Allison is Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University. She is the author of Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination; Permitted and Prohibited Desires: Mothers, Comics, and Censorship in Japan; and Nightwork: Sexuality, Pleasure, and Corporate Masculinity in a Tokyo Hostess Club and a coeditor of the journal Cultural Anthropology.

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