Roman Berytus: Beirut in Late Antiquity

Front Cover
Routledge, Jun 1, 2004 - History - 408 pages
0 Reviews

Examining the numerous primary sources, including inscriptions, religions, histories, literary references, legal codes, and archaeological reports, Linda Jones Hall presents a composite history of late antique Berytus - from its founding as a Roman colony in the time of Augustus, to its development into a center of legal study under Justinian.

The book examines all aspects of life in the city, including geographical setting, economic base, built environment, political structures, religious transitions from paganism to Christianity, and the self-identity of the inhabitants in terms of ethnicity and occupation.

This volume provides:

* the first detailed investigation of late antique Phoenicia
* a look at religious affiliations are traced among pagans, Jews, and Christians
* a study of the bishops and the churches.

The full texts of numerous narratives are presented to reveal the aspirations of the law students, the professors, and their fellow citizens such as the artisans. The study also explores the cultural implications of the city's Greek, Roman and then Syro-Phoenician heritage.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 The geographical setting
15
3 The economic base of the city
21
4 Berytus as Colonia and Civitas
45
5 The built environment of Berytus
60
6 Provincial organization in the Roman and Late Antique eras
85
7 Paganism and cultural identity
129
8 Christianity as change in religious identity
161
10 Artisans occupational identity and social status
221
11 Conclusion
255
Province of Syria
260
Province of Phoenicia
268
Lawyers law professors and law students
280
Coins attributed to the mint in Berytus
286
Bibliography
299
Index
361

9 A city of lawyers professors and students
195

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information