Cavalry Operations in the Ancient Greek World

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University of Oklahoma Press, 2004 - Literary Criticism - 345 pages
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In this comprehensive narrative, Robert E. Gaebel challenges conventional views of cavalry operations in the Greek world. Applying both military and historical perspectives, Gaebel shows that until the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C., cavalry played a larger role than is commonly recognized.

Gaebel traces the operational use of cavalry in the ancient Greek world from circa 500 to 150 B.C., the end of Greek and Macedonian independence. Emphasizing the Greek and Hellenistic periods (359322 B.C.), he provides information about the military use of horses in the eastern Mediterranean, Greek stable management and horse care, and broad battlefield goals.

 

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User Review  - AndreasJ - www.librarything.com

This is basically a survey of all actions by Greek or Macedonian cavalry from the Persian Wars to the battle of Pydna of which the surviving sources provide any detail to speak of. From this Gaebel ... Read full review

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User Review  - setnahkt - LibraryThing

I was involved in an online discussion that dealt with the evolution of horse cavalry, and since in that thread I made some pronouncements about various things, I thought it might be a good idea to ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
3
The Greek Horse
21
HorseDrawn Chariots in the Near East and Greece
33
Late Bronze
44
500 to 479 B C
63
479 to 432 B C
81
431 to 404 B C
90
404 to 399 B C
110
359 to 336 B C
143
336 to 323 B C
159
The Successors from the Death of Alexander to
199
300 to 150 B C
230
218 to 202 B C
263
Conclusion
277
List of Battles Discussed in the Text
313
Glossary
323

395 to 386 B C
116
386 to 371 B C
124

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About the author (2004)

Robert E. Gaebel is retired as Chair of the Department of Classics at the University of Akron, Ohio.

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