Shakespeare's Play of King Henry the Fourth: Printed from a Contemporary Manuscript, Volume 19, Issue 2

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Shakespeare society, 1845 - 121 pages
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Page 37 - Should I turn upon the true prince ? Why, thou knowest, I am as valiant as Hercules: but beware instinct; the lion will not touch the true prince. Instinct is a great matter ; I was a coward on instinct. I shall think the better of myself and thee, during my life; I, for a valiant lion, and thou for a true prince.
Page 13 - But, I remember, when the fight was done, When I was dry with rage, and extreme toil, Breathless and faint, leaning upon my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, trimly...
Page 76 - tis no matter; Honour pricks me on. Yea, but how if honour prick me off when I come on ? how then ? Can honour set to a leg? No. Or an arm? No. Or take away the grief of a wound ? No. Honour hath no skill in surgery then ? No. What is honour? A word. What is in that word, honour? What is that honour? Air. A trim reckoning ! — Who hath it? He that died o
Page 123 - THE | Second part of Henrie | the fourth, continuing to his death, | and coronation of Henrie \ the fift. | With the humours of sir lohn Fal- | staffe, and swaggering \ Pistoll. | As it hath been sundrie times publikely \ acted by the right honourable, the Lord | Chamberlaine his seruants. | Written by William Shakespeare. \ LONDON | Printed by VS for Andrew Wise, and | William Aspley. | 1600.
Page 47 - Why, so can I, or so can any man ; But will they come, when you do call for them ? Glend.
Page 123 - With the battell at Shrewsburie, betweene the King and Lord Henry Percy, surnamed Henrie Hotspur of the North. With the humorous conceits of Sir lohn Falstalffe. At London, Printed by PS for Andrew Wise, dwelling in Paules Churchyard, at the signe of the Angell. 1598.
Page 76 - Wednesday. Doth he feel it? no. Doth he hear it? no. 'Tis insensible, then? Yea, to the dead. But will it not live with the living? no. Why? detraction will not suffer it. Therefore I'll none of it. Honour is a mere scutcheon: and so ends my catechism.
Page 12 - ... off, And pay the debt I never promised, By how much better than my word I am, By so much shall I falsify men's hopes ; And, like bright metal on a sullen ground, My reformation, glittering o'er my fault, Shall show more goodly and attract more eyes Than that which hath no foil to set it off. I'll so offend, to make offence a skill; Redeeming time when men think least I will [Exit.
Page 118 - Raspays also, Whippett and Pyngmedo, that ben lawyers therto : And I will have also wyne de Ryne, With new maid Clarye, that is good and fyne, Muscadell, Terantyne, and Bastard, With Ypocras and Pyment comyng afterwarde.