The Enigma of Arrival

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Apr 20, 2011 - Fiction - 368 pages
5 Reviews
The story of a writer's singular journey—from one place to another, from the British colony of Trinidad to the ancient countryside of England, and from one state of mind to another—this is perhaps Naipaul's most autobiographical work. Yet it is also woven through with remarkable invention to make it a rich and complex novel.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Myckyee - LibraryThing

Beautifully written, but a bit repetitive. Also a bit sad. Good book club book, you would have to be in the right mood to appreciate this book. Four stars for the writing. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - m.belljackson - LibraryThing

This seems both an ode to depression and death and may well be the first of the endless modern novels that insist on the right to include an indelible image of cruelty to animals. Will men never end their hideous cruelties? Will writers never end their need to horrify us? Read full review

Contents

THE JOURNEY
IVY
ROOKS
THE CEREMONY OF FAREWELL
By VS Naipaul
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

V.S. Naipaul was born in Trinidad in 1932. He came to England on a scholarship in 1950. He spent four years at University College, Oxford, and began to write, in London, in 1954. He pursued no other profession.
 
His novels include A House for Mr Biswas, The Mimic Men, Guerrillas, A Bend in the River, and The Enigma of Arrival. In 1971 he was awarded the Booker Prize for In a Free State. His works of nonfiction, equally acclaimed, include Among the Believers, Beyond Belief, The Masque of Africa, and a trio of books about India: An Area of Darkness, India: A Wounded Civilization and India: A Million Mutinies Now.
 
In 1990, V.S. Naipaul received a knighthood for services to literature; in 1993, he was the first recipient of the David Cohen British Literature Prize. He received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2001. He lived with his wife Nadira and cat Augustus in Wiltshire, and died in 2018.

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