Freedom's Battle: The Origins of Humanitarian Intervention

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Aug 19, 2008 - History - 496 pages
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This gripping and important book brings alive over two hundred years of humanitarian interventions. Freedom’s Battle illuminates the passionate debates between conscience and imperialism ignited by the first human rights activists in the 19th century, and shows how a newly emergent free press galvanized British, American, and French citizens to action by exposing them to distant atrocities. Wildly romantic and full of bizarre enthusiasms, these activists were pioneers of a new political consciousness. And their legacy has much to teach us about today’s human rights crises.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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Contents

Humanitarianism or Imperialism?
10
Media and Solidarity
29
The Diplomacy of Humanitarian Intervention
41
PART TWO GREEKS
46
The Greek Revolution
50
The Scio Massacre
67
The London Greek Committee
77
The Massacres
86
PART FOURI BULGARIAN
233
The Eastern Question Chapter 19 PanSlavism
242
Bosnia and Serbia
248
Bulgarian Horrors
256
Gladstone vs Disraeli
266
The RussoTurkish War 197
303
The Midlothian Campaign
306
PART FIVEZ CONCLUSION
313

The Holy Alliance
117
A Rumor ofSlaughter
123
Navarino
139
PART THREE SYRIANS
152
Public Opinion
182
Occupying Syria
190
Mission Creep 2 13
215
Armenians
315
The Uses of History
341
The International Politics of Humanitarian Intervention
351
A New imperialism?
376
Napoleon the Little 159
390
Index
487
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Gary J. Bass is a professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University. He is the author of Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals. A former reporter for The Economist, he has written often for the New York Times, and has also written for The New Yorker, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, The New Republic, and Foreign Affairs.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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