The Luck of the Bodkins

Front Cover
Random House, Jul 15, 2009 - Fiction - 368 pages
5 Reviews

A P.G. Wodehouse novel

Seize this wonderful chance to embark on a Wodehousian voyage on the luxurious liner S.S. Atlantic - in the company of Monty Bodkin, whose passion for Gertrude Butterwick knows no bounds (except those set by the wild-at-heart Hollywood starlet Lotus Blossom and her pet alligator). Also aboard are a movie mogul, the centre-forward for the All-England ladies hockey team and the two Tennyson brothers (one of whom has been mistaken for the late poet laureate and given a fat movie contract...). Also a chatty steward, and a mouse doll in which all manner of things can be hidden. This hilarious comic novel is Wodehouse at full sail - a voyage of pure delight.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - soraki - LibraryThing

When Monty Bodkin's fiance Gertrude unexpectedly breaks off their engagement, he follows her abroad a transatlantic ocean liner to find out why and win her back. Gertrude's cousin Reggie tries to help ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - losloper - LibraryThing

Monty Bodkin's pursuit of Gertude Butterwick is temporarily interrupted by his encounter with silver-screen siren Miss Lotus Blossom, who sees in him a means of restoring relations with her idol, the ... Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (always known as ‘Plum’) wrote more than ninety novels and some three hundred short stories over 73 years. He is widely recognised as the greatest 20th-century writer of humour in the English language.

Perhaps best known for the escapades of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, Wodehouse also created the world of Blandings Castle, home to Lord Emsworth and his cherished pig, the Empress of Blandings. His stories include gems concerning the irrepressible and disreputable Ukridge; Psmith, the elegant socialist; the ever-so-slightly-unscrupulous Fifth Earl of Ickenham, better known as Uncle Fred; and those related by Mr Mulliner, the charming raconteur of The Angler’s Rest, and the Oldest Member at the Golf Club.

In 1936 he was awarded the Mark Twain Prize for ‘having made an outstanding and lasting contribution to the happiness of the world’. He was made a Doctor of Letters by Oxford University in 1939 and in 1975, aged 93, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. He died shortly afterwards, on St Valentine’s Day.

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