Timaeus and Critias

Front Cover
Penguin, 1971 - Philosophy - 167 pages
21 Reviews
Taking the form of dialogues between Socrates, Timaeus, Critias and Hermocrates, these two works are among Plato's final writings. In Timaeus, he gives a thorough account of the world in which we live, describing a cosmos composed of four elements - earth, air, fire and water - which combine to give existence to all things. An exploration of the origins of the universe, life and humanity, which outlines not just physical laws but also metaphysical and religious principles, it remained a paradigm of science for two thousand years. The mysterious preamble to Timaeus contains the first account in literature of Atlantis, while the fragmentary Critias, unfinished by its author, provides a spellbinding description of the lost continent's ideal society, which Critias asserts was created by the god-like children of Poseidon himself.
 

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Review: Timaeus/Critias

User Review  - Joshua - Goodreads

The Timaeus is a very strange book. It attempts to explain the formation of the universe and the creation of humans. The explanations are weird and I found them somewhat disturbing. I was reminded of ... Read full review

Review: Timaeus/Critias

User Review  - Richard Thomason - Goodreads

I do not have knowledge of the ancient Greek to crtique the translation, but the prose is fluid and clear, with helpful notes explaining where there were any interesting niceties in the original ... Read full review

All 6 reviews »

Selected pages

Contents

INTRODUCTION
7
TIMAEUS
27
SUMMARY OF CONTENTS OF TIMAEUS BY NUMBERED SECTIONS
125
CRITIAS
127
APPENDIX ON ATLANTIS
146
Copyright

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About the author (1971)

Plato (c. 427-347 BC) founded the Academy in Athens, the prototype of all Western universities, and wrote more than twenty philosophical dialogues.

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