Shipwrecks and Disasters at Sea, Or, Historical Narratives of the Most Noted Calamities, and Providential Deliveries from Fire and Famine, on the Ocean

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R.P. Bixby, 1844 - History - 427 pages
 

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Page 241 - That part of the island we had landed on was a narrow ridge, not above musket-shot across, bounded on one side by the sea, and on the other by a creek, extending upwards of a mile inland, and nearly communicating with the sea at its head.
Page vi - Now to the north, from Afric's burning shore, A troop of porpoises their course explore; In curling wreaths they gambol on the tide, Now bound aloft, now down the billow glide : Their tracks awhile the hoary waves retain, That burn in sparkling trails along the main— These fleetest coursers of the finny race, When threatening clouds the' etherial vault deface, Their route to leeward still sagacious form, To shun the fury of the
Page 225 - Went to supper — bread, cheese, and porter : the purser frightened out of his wits about his bread -bags; the two marine officers as white as sheets, not understanding the ship's working so much, and the noise of the lower deck guns, which by this time made a pretty screeching to people not used to it : it seemed as if the whole ship's side was going at each roll. Wooden, our carpenter, was all this time smoking his pipe and laughing at the doctor; the second lieutenant upon deck, the third in...
Page 163 - ... mercy of Him, whose arm, they exclaimed, was at length outstretched to smite them ; others were to be seen hastily crossing themselves, and performing the various external acts required by their peculiar persuasion, while a number of the older and more stout-hearted...
Page 35 - The wind, as if by divine command, at this very moment ceased to blow. We hauled the boat out; the dreadful surges that were nearly bursting upon us, suddenly subsided, making a path for our boat about twenty yards wide, through which we rowed her out as smoothly as if she had been on a river in a calm, whilst on each side of us, and not more than ten yards distant, the surf continued to break twenty feet high, and with unabated fury. We had to row nearly a mile in this manner : all were fully convinced...
Page 219 - ... still continued ; day followed day, and no sail. The dollar bag began to grow a little bulky, for every one had lost two or three times, and no one had won : (this was a small gambling party entered into by Sir Hyde and ourselves...
Page 231 - I now thought there was no probability of the ship's soon going to pieces, therefore had not a thought of instant death: took a look round with a kind of philosophic eye, to see how the same situation affected my companions, and was surprised to find the most swaggering, swearing bullies in fine weather, now the most pitiful wretches on earth, when death appeared before them. However, two got safe; by which means, with a line, we got a hawser on shore, and made fast to the rocks, upon which many...
Page 17 - ... vanished in an instant, as the vessel was carried by a current and a sea directly towards the breakers, and she struck! We let go the best bower anchor; all sails were taken in as fast as possible: surge after surge came thundering on, and drove her in spite of anchors, partly with her head on shore. She struck with such violence as to start every man from the deck.
Page 248 - They cannot, I believe, send up more than five hundred men ; but with two hundred such as now stand around me, I do not fear a thousand, nay, fifteen hundred of them. I have the fullest confidence...
Page 225 - ... after a hard struggle, she wore ; found she did not make so good weather on this tack as on the other ; for as the sea began to run across, she had not time to rise from one sea before another lashed against her.

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