The Cambridge Introduction to Virginia Woolf

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 14, 2006 - Literary Criticism
For students of modern literature, the works of Virginia Woolf are essential reading. In her novels, short stories, essays, polemical pamphlets and in her private letters she explored, questioned and refashioned everything about modern life: cinema, sexuality, shopping, education, feminism, politics and war. Her elegant and startlingly original sentences became a model of modernist prose. This is a clear and informative introduction to Woolf's life, works, and cultural and critical contexts, explaining the importance of the Bloomsbury group in the development of her work. It covers the major works in detail, including To the Lighthouse, Mrs Dalloway, The Waves and the key short stories. As well as providing students with the essential information needed to study Woolf, Jane Goldman suggests further reading to allow students to find their way through the most important critical works. All students of Woolf will find this a useful and illuminating overview of the field.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1
1
The 1920s
17
19301941
21
Chapter 2
25
Biographies
27
Bloomsbury
32
Wider historical and political contexts
33
Chapter 3
37
The Waves 1931
69
dominates critical responses The novel is sometimes read as
75
Woolfs nonfiction
96
Here Woolf is outlining a distinctly English tradition of dissent
106
Other essays
112
CE4 174 One target is the subconscious Hitlerism in men
122
Chapter 4
123
Introductory reading
125

There is no reason to think that the lighthouse in
40
Out itself is further complicated by Woolfs quite substantial revisions
47
oppositions has encouraged critics to read it in terms of
50
The mainstream Hollywood film The Hours has encouraged a further
58
Critical reception
127
philosophy psychology myth
129
feminism androgyny
130
feminism historicism
134

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About the author (2006)

Jane Goldman is Senior Lecturer in English and American Literature at the University of Dundee.

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