The Commerce of Cartography: Making and Marketing Maps in Eighteenth-Century France and England

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University of Chicago Press, 2005 - History - 345 pages
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Though the political and intellectual history of mapmaking in the eighteenth century is well established, the details of its commercial revolution have until now been widely scattered. In The Commerce of Cartography, Mary Pedley presents a vivid picture of the costs and profits of the mapmaking industry in England and France, and reveals how the economics of map trade affected the content and appearance of the maps themselves.

Conceptualizing the relationship between economics and cartography, Pedley traces the process of mapmaking from compilation, production, and marketing to consumption, reception, and criticism. In detailing the rise of commercial cartography, Pedley explores qualitative issues of mapmaking as well. Why, for instance, did eighteenth-century ideals of aesthetics override the modern values of accuracy and detail? And what, to an eighteenth-century mind and eye, qualified as a good map?

A thorough and engaging study of the business of cartography during the Enlightenment, The Commerce of Cartography charts a new cartographic landscape and will prove invaluable to scholars of economic history, historical geography, and the history of publishing.
 

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Contents

VIII
19
X
35
XII
71
XIV
73
XVI
96
XVIII
119
XX
157
XXII
159
XXVII
222
XXIX
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XXXI
233
XXXIII
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XXXV
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XXXVII
240
XXXIX
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XL
257

XXIV
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XXV
205

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Page 10 - The increasingly adopted operational definition of 'maps' as 'graphic representations that facilitate a spatial understanding of things, concepts, conditions, processes, or events in the human world...

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About the author (2005)

Mary Sponberg Pedley is adjunct assistant curator of maps at the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan, a Latin instructor in the Ann Arbor Public School system, and the associate editor of Imago Mundi: The International Journal for the History of Cartography.

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