Political Activists in America: The Identity Construction Model of Political Participation

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Penn State Press, Jan 1, 2009 - Political Science - 180 pages
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Through vivid portrayals of political activists, Political Activists in America offers a fresh analysis of why people become involved in politics. Based on interviews with environmental, social justice, and pro-life activists, the book argues, contrary to both popular opinion and the main approaches of political science, that active involvement in politics can be deeply fulfilling to the individual. The identity construction approach is the core of the book's argument and shows how activists value political involvement for themselves.

The book argues against approaches that see politics as an inherently costly or unpleasant activity. In contrast, the identity construction approach sees political activism as enabling activists to become people whom they would otherwise have been unable to become. The construction of identity for all activists is both about morality and about what one wants for oneself, and hence it illustrates shortcomings in approaches that divide motivations into either the &"self-interested&" or the &"altruistic.&"

 

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Contents

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About the author (2009)

Nathan Teske has a PhD in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley. He works for Catholic Charities in Oregon.

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