The King and the Commons: Cavalier and Puritan Song

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Henry Morley
Scribner, Welford, and Company, 1869 - Ballads, English - 198 pages
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Page 83 - Tell her that's young, And shuns to have her grace spy'd, That hadst thou sprung In deserts, where no men abide, Thou must have uncommended died. Small is the worth Of beauty from the light retired ; Bid her come forth, Suffer her self to be desired, And not blush so to be admired.
Page 179 - Piemontese, that roll'd Mother with infant down the rocks. Their moans The vales redoubled to the hills, and they To heaven. Their martyr'd blood and ashes sow O'er all the Italian fields, where still doth sway The triple tyrant; that from these may grow A hundredfold, who, having learn'd thy way, Early may fly the Babylonian woe.
Page 179 - redoubled to the hills, and they To heaven. Their martyr'd blood and ashes sow O'er all the Italian fields, where still doth sway The triple tyrant; that from these may grow A hundredfold, who, having learn'd thy way, Early may fly the Babylonian woe. John Milton. ON
Page 156 - bawl for freedom in their senseless mood, And still revolt when truth would set them free. Licence they mean when they cry liberty; For who loves that must first be wise and good ; But from that mark how far they rove we see For all this waste of wealth and loss of blood. WHEN THE
Page 72 - that loves a rosy cheek, Or a coral lip admires, Or from star-like eyes doth seek Fuel to maintain his fires ; As old time makes these decay, So his flames must waste away. But a smooth and steadfast mind, Gentle thoughts, and calm desires, Hearts with equal love combined, Kindle never-dying fires. Lovely cheeks, or lips, or eyes.
Page 206 - 6d. I. THE GENTLE LIFE. Essays in Aid of the Formation of Character of Gentlemen and Gentlewomen. Ninth Edition. " His notion of a gentleman is of the noblest and truest order. The colume is a capital specimen of what may be done by honest reason.
Page 83 - Bid her come forth, Suffer her self to be desired, And not blush so to be admired. Then die, that she The common fate of all things rare May read in thee: How small a part of time they share, That are so wond'rous sweet and fair. Edmund Waller. TO
Page 81 - did evermore disdain A rival on my throne. He either fears his fate too much, Or his deserts are small, That dares not put it to the touch To gain or lose it all. [i
Page 204 - birth. This is the happy warrior; this is he That every man in arms would wish to be."—Wordsworth. SAINT LOUIS, KING OF FRANCE. The curious and characteristic Life of this Monarch by De Joinville. Translated by James Hutton. " St. Louis and his companions, as described by Joincille, not only in their glistening armour, but in
Page 117 - The eagle's fate and mine are one, Which on the shaft that made him die Espied a feather of his own, Wherewith he wont to soar so high. Had Echo, with so sweet a grace, Narcissus' loud complaints return'd, Not for reflection of his face, But of his voice, the boy had burn'd. ON A GIRDLE.

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