The Future of Nostalgia

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Basic Books, Mar 28, 2002 - History - 432 pages
2 Reviews
What happens to Old World memories in a New World order? Svetlana Boym opens up a new avenue of inquiry: the study of nostalgia.
 

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The future of nostalgia

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The current U.S. craze for nostalgia runs from automobiles (the PT Cruiser) to fashion (the return of bell-bottoms) to television (TV Land reruns). Despite modern technology and conveniences, we enjoy ... Read full review

Review: The Future of Nostalgia

User Review  - Levon - Goodreads

A little verbose, but also really touching. A rare combination. Rigorously routed in the examination of monumentality, it also offers insight into the political climes and memories of the soviet bloc ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

From Cured Soldiers to Incurable Romantics Nostalgia and Progress
1
The Angel of History Nostalgia and Modernity
17
The Dinosaur Nostalgia and Popular Culture
31
Restorative Nostalgia Conspiracies and Return to Origins
39
Reflective Nostalgia Virtual Reality and Collective Memory
47
Nostalgia and PostCommunist Memory
55
Archeology of Metropolis
73
Moscow the Russian Rome
81
On Diasporic Intimacy
249
Vladimir Nabokovs False Passport
257
Joseph Brodskys Room and a Half
283
Ilya Kabakovs Toilet
307
Immigrant Souvenirs
325
Aesthetic Individualism and the Ethics of Nostalgia
335
Nostalgia and the Global Culture From Outer Space to Cyberspace
343
Notes
355

St Petersburg the Cosmopolitan Province
119
Berlin the Virtual Capital
171
Europas Eros
217
Index
389
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About the author (2002)

Svetlana Boym is a writer and Professor of Slavic and Comparative Literature at Harvard. She is the author of Common Places: Mythologies of Everyday Life in Russia and Death in Quotation Marks: Cultural Myths of the Modern Poet, as well as of short stories, plays, and a novel. She is a native of St. Petersburg, and lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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