Anglia, Volume 29

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Page 21 - sir. To her father's hail they arrived strait; ‘Twas moated round abouta; She slipped herself within the gate, And lockt the knight withouta. Here is a silver penny to spend, And take it for your pain, sir; And two of my father's men I'll send To wait on you back again, sir.
Page 3 - And canst thou wretch be false to him that is faithfull to thee? Shall hys curtesie be cause of thy crueltie? Wilt thou violate the league of fayth, to enherite the land of folly? Shal affectiö be of more force then friendshippe, loue then law, lust then loyaltie?
Page 499 - and the laneret for an esquire. The marlyon for a lady. The hobby for a young man. The goshawk for a yeoman. The tercel for a poor man. The sparrowhawk for a priest. The musket for a holy water clerk The
Page 8 - And thus, and thus, and thus, thus much I love thee. [Kisses him. K. of CiL: For all these vows, beshrew me, If I prove ye: My faith unto my king shall not be fals'd. Alv.: Good Lord, how men are coy when they are crav'd! K. of Cil.: Madam, behold our king approacheth nigh.
Page 21 - slipped herself within the gate, And lockt the knight withouta. Here is a silver penny to spend, And take it for your pain, sir; And two of my father's men I'll send To wait on you back again, sir.
Page 499 - The eagle, the vulture and the merloun for an emperor. The gerfaulcon and the tercel of the gerfaulcon for a king. The faulcon gentle and the tercel gentle for a prince. The faulcon of the rock for a duke. The faulcon peregrine
Page 3 - without baseness, Without the stain of honour? shall not people Say liberally hereafter, ‘There's the lady That lost her father, friend, herself, her faith too, To fawn upon a stranger,' — for aught you know As faithless as yourself
Page 49 - I protest, Sir John, you come as high from Tripoly as I do, every whit —‘) and lift as many joined stools, and leap over them, if you would use it.
Page 306 - or dale, or in the fomying flood: Thrall, or at large, aliue where so I dwell: Sicke, or in health: in euyll fame, or good. Hers will I be, and onely with this thought Content my seLfe, although my chaunce be nought.
Page 137 - Manuscripts and other rare documents, illustrative of some of the more minute particulars of English history, biography and manners from the reign of Henry VIII.

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