Prometheus Bound

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Oxford University Press, USA, 1989 - Drama - 117 pages
For readers accustomed to the relatively undramatic standard translations of Prometheus Bound, this version by James Scully, a poet and winner of the Lamont Poetry Prize, and C. John Herington, one of the world's foremost Aeschylean scholars, will come as a revelation. Scully and Herington accentuate the play's true power, drama, and relevance to modern times. Aeschylus originally wrote Prometheus Bound as part of a tragic trilogy, and this translation is unique in including the extant fragments of the companion plays.
 

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Contents

A Note on this Translation
23
Prometheus Bound
27
Notes to the Translation
87
The Fragmentary Prometheus Plays
99
Glossary
111
Copyright

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Page 11 - The long history of the interpretation of the Prometheus Bound is almost the history of a mirror. Romantics, liberals, and socialists, gazing into these disturbing depths, have found there an Aeschylean justification of romanticism, liberalism, and socialism, respectively. Authoritarians on the contrary, from the medieval Byzantines onwards, have emphasized with approval the crushing punishment ultimately accorded to the rebel against the Supreme Authority. In a word: Tell me what you are, and I...
Page 17 - Zeus is a Tyrant!", the Unbound responded with the antithesis, "Zeus is a Savior!", and that in the light of this response a synthesis became possible: the reconciliation of the almighty power of Zeus with the civilizing intelligence of Prometheus.
Page v - But our most urgent need is for a recreation of these plays — as though they had been written, freshly and greatly, by masters fully at home in the English of our own times".

About the author (1989)


James Scully is Professor of English at the University of Connecticut. He is the author of several volumes of poetry, including The Marches, and winner of the Lamont Poetry Prize.
C. John Herington is Professor of Classics and Talcott Professor of Greek at Yale University. He is the author of several books, including Poetry into Drama and Aeschylus.

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