The Snow-Image, and Other Twice-Told Tales

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Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, 1853 - Fiction - 273 pages
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The Snow-Image, and Other Twice-Told Tales is the final collection of short stories published by Nathaniel Hawthorne in his lifetime, appearing in 1852.
"The Snow-Image" (1850); "The Great Stone Face" (1850); "Main-street" (1849); "Ethan Brand" (1850); "A Bell's Biography" (1837); "Sylph Etherege" (1838); "The Canterbury Pilgrims" (1833);"Old News" (1835); "The Man of Adamant" (1837); "The Devil in Manuscript" (1835);
"John Inglefield's Thanksgiving"(1840); "Old Ticonderoga" (1836); "The Wives of the Dead" (1832); "Little Daffydowndilly" (1843); "My Kinsman, Major Molineux" (1832);

 

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Page 34 - They know everything — oh, to be sure! — everything that has been, and everything that is, and everything that by any future possibility can be. And should some phenomenon of nature or providence transcend their system, they will not recognize it, even if it come to pass under their very noses. " Wife,
Page 42 - ... servants, the harbingers of Mr. Gathergold, who, in his own majestic person, was expected to arrive at sunset. Our friend Ernest, meanwhile, had been deeply stirred by the idea that the great man, the noble man, the man of prophecy, after so many ages of delay, was at length to be made manifest to his native valley. He knew, boy as he was, that there were a thousand ways in which Mr. Gathergold, with his vast wealth, might transform himself into an angel of beneficence, and assume a control over...
Page 36 - ONE afternoon, when the sun was going down, a mother and her little boy sat at the door of their cottage, talking about the Great Stone Face. They had but to lift their eyes, and there it was plainly to be seen, though miles away, with the sunshine brightening all its features.
Page 39 - His mother was an affectionate and thoughtful woman, and felt that it was wisest not to discourage the generous hopes of her little boy. So she only said to him,
Page 48 - ... a resemblance as the crowd had testified ? Alas, Ernest could not recognize it! He beheld a warworn and, weather-beaten countenance, full of energy, and expressive of an iron will; but the gentle wisdom, the deep, broad, tender sympathies were altogether wanting in Old Blood-and-Thunder's visage; and even if the Great Stone Face had assumed his look of stern command, the milder traits would still have tempered it. " This is not the man of prophecy," sighed Ernest to himself, as he made his way...
Page 277 - NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE'S WRITINGS. TWICE-TOLD TALES. Two volumes. Price $1.50. THE SCARLET LETTER. Price 75 cents. THE HOUSE OF THE SEVEN GABLES. Price $1.00. THE SNOW IMAGE, AND OTHER TWICE-TOLD TALES, Price 75 cents. THE BLITHEDALE ROMANCE. Price 75 cents.
Page 248 - The reader, in order to avoid a long and dry detail of colonial affairs, is requested to dispense with an account of the train of circumstances that had caused much temporary inflammation of the popular mind.
Page 272 - the old earth is frolicsome to-night!" When there was a momentary calm in that tempestuous sea of sound, the leader gave the sign, the procession resumed its march. On they went, like fiends that throng in mockery around some dead potentate, mighty no more, but majestic still in his agony. On they went, in counterfeited pomp, in senseless uproar, in frenzied merriment, trampling all on an old man's heart.
Page 45 - ... that a native-born son of the valley, many years before, had enlisted as a soldier, and, after a great deal of hard fighting, had now become an illustrious commander. Whatever he may be called in history, he was known in camps and on the battle-field under the nickname of Old Bloodand-Thunder.
Page 37 - The Great Stone Face, then, was a work of Nature in her mood of majestic playfulness, formed on the perpendicular side of a mountain by some immense rocks, which had been thrown together in such a position as, when viewed at a proper distance, precisely to resemble the features of the human countenance.

About the author (1853)

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 – 1864) was an American novelist and short story writer.
Much of Hawthorne's writing centers on New England, many works featuring moral allegories with a Puritan inspiration. His fiction works are considered part of the Romantic movement and, more specifically, Dark romanticism. His themes often center on the inherent evil and sin of humanity, and his works often have moral messages and deep psychological complexity. His published works include novels, short stories, and a biography of his friend Franklin Pierce.

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