Europe in Crisis: Intellectuals and the European Idea, 1917-1957

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Mark Hewitson, Matthew D’Auria
Berghahn Books, Oct 1, 2012 - History - 360 pages
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The period between 1917 and 1957, starting with the birth of the USSR and the American intervention in the First World War and ending with the Treaty of Rome, is of the utmost importance for contextualizing and understanding the intellectual origins of the European Community. During this time of 'crisis,' many contemporaries, especially intellectuals, felt they faced a momentous decision which could bring about a radically different future. The understanding of what Europe was and what it should be was questioned in a profound way, forcing Europeans to react. The idea of a specifically European unity finally became, at least for some, a feasible project, not only to avoid another war but to avoid the destruction of the idea of European unity. This volume reassesses the relationship between ideas of Europe and the European project and reconsiders the impact of long and short-term political transformations on assumptions about the continent’s scope, nature, role and significance.

 

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Contents

PROLOGUE
11
Crisis and Integration
35
Inventing Europe and Reinventing the NationState in
63
REIMAGINING THE PAST
83
Richard Nikolaus CoudenhoveKalergi Founder of
89
Noble Continent? GermanSpeaking Nobles as Theorists
111
Rudolf Pannwitz and the German
135
New Middle Ages or New Modernity? Carl Schmitts
155
MAKING SENSE OF THE PRESENT
199
Huizinga Intellectual Cooperation and the Spirit
243
The Idea of European Unity in Heinrich Manns Political
257
Lucien Febvre and the Idea of Europe
271
LOOKING TO THE FUTURE
285
The Continuity and Persistence
305
Europe between a Crisis of Culture and Political Regeneration
323
Select Bibliography
337

Rosenzweig Schmitt and the Concept of Europe
169
Changing Images of Europe
183

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About the author (2012)

Mark Hewitson is Professor of German History and Politics and Director of European Social and Political Studies at University College London.

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