Three Hundred Zeroes: Lessons of the Heart on the Appalachian Trail

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Dennis R. Blanchard, 2010 - Travel - 328 pages
11 Reviews
Dennis Blanchard's promise to his brother haunted him for over forty years. Finally, when there were no more excuses, he set out on the Appalachian Trail to fulfill that promise. He learned that walking in the wilderness can reconnect one with a Norman Rockwell America that at times seems long lost and forgotten. The difficulties encountered walking over 2,200 miles are easily underestimated and trouble can begin long before setting a first step on the trail. Blanchard's introspective demonstrates that bears, rattlesnakes and challenging terrain may be far less formidable than some of life's more subtle dangers.
 

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Review: Three Hundred Zeroes: Lessons of the heart on the Appalachian Trail.

User Review  - Goodreads

An interesting read! The book reads like a shelter log, which makes it a quick read. "K1" has a very concise writing style, probably because he is an engineer by trade, but it was very funny at times, always interesting, and it gave me a lot to think about as we plan our thru hike. Read full review

Review: Three Hundred Zeroes: Lessons of the heart on the Appalachian Trail.

User Review  - Goodreads

Interesting account of a 2 year hike of the AT. Dennis focuses on the unexpected stories of the "trail angels" encountered along the way, and his own personal challenges and victories. The warmth of ... Read full review

Contents

Florida
3
Georgia
21
North Carolina
41
Tennessee
77
Virginia 2007
95
Part II
111
300 Zeros
113
Part III
123
New Jersey
187
New York
197
Connecticut
209
Massachusetts
221
Vermont
233
New Hampshire
247
Maine
279
Epilog
321

Virginia 2008
125
West Virginia
153
Pennsylvania
163
Hiking resources
325
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Dennis Blanchard was born in Bristol, Connecticut. After a stint in the U.S. Air Force he moved to New Hampshire with his wife, Jane. Never living very far from the Appalachian Trail, there was always the seductive siren's call to hike it. To support his hiking habit he has spent most of his life working as an electronics engineer. Dennis is an avid ham radio enthusiast and has authored many pieces for magazines such as the amateur radio journal, QST and other technical magazines, as well as motorcycle adventure articles. When not off wandering in the woods he lives in Sarasota, Florida. 

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