The Writings of George Washington: pt. I. Official letters relating to the French war, and private letters before the American revolution: March, 1754-May, 1775

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American Stationers' Company, John B. Russell, 1834 - Presidents
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Page 446 - I put out my setting pole to try to stop the raft, that the ice might pass by ; when the rapidity of the stream threw it with so much violence against the pole, that it jerked me out into ten feet water : but I fortunately saved myself by catching hold of one of the raft logs. Notwithstanding all our efforts, we could not get to either shore, but were obliged, as we were near an island to quit our raft and make to it.
Page 380 - I am, with the greatest respect, my Lord, your Lordship's most obedient and most humble servant. TO THE REVEREND DR.
Page 444 - We had a tedious and very fatiguing passage down the creek. Several times we had like to have been staved against rocks ; and many times were obliged all hands to get out and remain in the water half an hour or more, getting over the shoals. At one place, the ice had lodged, and made it impassable by water ; we were, therefore, obliged to carry our canoe across the neck of land, a quarter of a mile over.
Page 432 - As I got down before the canoe, I spent some time in viewing the rivers and the land in the fork, which I think extremely well situated for a Fort, as it has the absolute command of both rivers.
Page 402 - I may be allowed to answer in the negative; and give me leave to add, as my opinion, that more blood will be spilled on this occasion, if the ministry are determined to push matters to extremity, than history has ever yet furnished instances of in the annals of North America...
Page 442 - In the bastions are a guard-house, chapel, doctor's lodging, and the commander's private store, round which are laid platforms for the cannon and men to stand on. There are several barracks without the fort, for the soldiers' dwellings, covered, some with bark and some with boards, made chiefly of logs.
Page 88 - ... we endeavored to rally them in hopes of regaining the ground and what we had left upon it, it was with as little success as if we had attempted to have stopped the wild bears of the mountains...
Page 405 - ... we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained, we must fight ; I repeat it. sir, we must fight ! An appeal to arms, and to the God of Hosts, is all that is left us ! They tell us, sir, that we are weak, unable to cope with so formidable an adversary.
Page 464 - That we were wilfully, or ignorantly, deceived by our interpreter in regard to, the word assassination, I do aver, and will to my dying moment ; so will every officer that was present. The interpreter was a Dutchman, little acquainted with the English tongue, therefore might not advert to the tone and meaning of the word in English ; but, whatever his motives were for so doing, certain it is, he called it the death, or the loss, of the Sieur Jumonville. So we received and so we understood it, until,...
Page 88 - I had four bullets through my coat, and two horses shot under me, yet escaped unhurt, although death was levelling my companions on every side...

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