A Social Archaeology of Households in Neolithic Greece: An Anthropological Approach

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 14, 2008 - History - 309 pages
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The study of households and everyday life is increasingly recognized as fundamental in social archeological analysis. This volume is the first to address the household as a process and as a conceptual and analytical means through which we can interpret social organization from the bottom up. Using detailed case studies from Neolithic Greece, Stella Souvatzi examines how the household is defined socially, culturally, and historically; she discusses household and community, variability, production and reproduction, individual and collective agency, identity, change, complexity, and integration. Her study is enriched by an in-depth discussion of the framework for the household in the social sciences and the synthesis of many anthropological, historical, and sociological examples. It reverses the view of the household as passive, ahistorical, and stable, showing it instead to be active, dynamic, and continually shifting.
 

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Contents

1 THE HOUSEHOLD IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES
7
2 THE HOUSEHOLD AS PROCESS IN A SOCIAL ARCHAEOLOGY
21
3 THE NEOLITHIC OF GREECE
47
THE EXAMPLES OF EARLY NEOLITHIC NEA NIKOMEDEIA AND MIDDLE NEOLITHIC SESKLO
63
LATE NEOLITHIC DIMINI A DETAILED CASE STUDY IN HOUSEHOLD ORGANISATION
107
6 HOMOGENEITY OR DIVERSITY? HOUSEHOLDS AS VARIABLE PROCESSES
161
7 EVOLUTION OR CONTINGENCY? HOUSEHOLDS AS TRANSITIONAL PROCESSES
205
IMPLICATIONS AND PROSPECTS FOR SOCIAL ARCHAEOLOGY
244
NOTES
263
BIBLIOGRAPHY
267
INDEX
297
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About the author (2008)

Stella G. Souvatzi is lecturer in Hellenic Civilization at the Hellenic Open University in Athens, Greece. A scholar of Neolithic Greece, she has conducted extensive fieldwork in Greece and has received support from the Hellenic State Scholarship Foundation, the A. G. Leventis Foundation, and the Institute for Aegean Prehistory. She has published widely on households, houses and communities in the British School at Athens Studies and in several edited collections.

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