Portraits: A Novel

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Open Road Media, Aug 27, 2013 - Fiction - 595 pages
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From New York’s Lower East Side to San Francisco, four generations of an immigrant family in America come to life in this New York Times–bestselling saga.
 In an act of great courage and will, Esther Sandsonitsky leaves her abusive new husband and tiny village on the border between Poland and Germany for the more welcoming shores of the United States. When she makes her way through the throng at Ellis Island, the world is on the threshold of a new century. But Esther is on her own quest: to capture a piece of the American dream for her children, including Jacob, the son she was forced to leave behind.
Portraits tells an indelible story of the struggles and sacrifices of a family—and a people—searching for a place to belong.  
 

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Contents

CHAPTER TWELVE
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
CHAPTER FOURTEEN
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
CHAPTER TWENTYONE
CHAPTER TWENTYTWO
CHAPTER TWENTYTHREE
CHAPTER TWENTYFOUR

CHAPTER
CHAPTER ELEVEN
CHAPTER TWENTYFIVE

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About the author (2013)

Cynthia Freeman (1915–1988) was the author of multiple bestselling novels, including Come Pour the Wine, No Time for Tears, and The Last Princess. Her novels sold more than twenty million copies worldwide. Born in New York City’s Lower East Side, she moved as a young child with her family to Northern California, where she grew up. She fell in love with and married her grandmother’s physician. After raising a family and becoming a successful interior decorator, a chronic illness forced her to adopt a more sedentary lifestyle. At the age of fifty-five, she began her literary career with the publication of A World Full of Strangers. Her love of San Francisco and her Jewish heritage drove her to write novels with the universal themes of survival, love, hate, self-discovery, joy, and pain, conveying the author’s steadfast belief in the ability of the human spirit to triumph over life’s sorrows.

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