Making an American Festival: Chinese New Year in San Francisco’s Chinatown

Front Cover
University of California Press, Sep 2, 2008 - History - 336 pages
1 Review
This provocative history of the largest annual Chinese celebration in the United States—the Chinese New Year parade and beauty pageant in San Francisco—opens a new window onto the evolution of one Chinese American community over the second half of the twentieth century. In a vividly detailed account that incorporates many different voices and perspectives, Chiou-ling Yeh explores the origins of these public events and charts how, from their beginning in 1953, they developed as a result of Chinese business community ties with American culture, business, and politics. What emerges is a fascinating picture of how an ethnic community shaped and was shaped by transnational and national politics, economics, ethnic movements, feminism, and queer activism.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Making an American Festival: Chinese New Year in San Francisco's Chinatown

User Review  - Goodreads

Based on a doctoral dissertation, this is a detailed behind-the-scenes examination of the history and role of the Chinese New Year celebrations and activities designed to promote tourism and cater to ... Read full review

Contents

Transnational Celebrations in Changing Political Climates
12
In the Traditions of China and in the Freedom of America The Making of the Chinese New Year Festival
29
Constructing A Model Minority Identity The Miss Chinatown USA Beauty Pageant
56
Yellow Power Race Class Gender and Activism
75
Heated Debate on the Ethnic Beauty Pageant
102
Hybridity in Culture Memory and Politics
122
Selling Chineseness and Marketing Chinese New Year Corporate Sponsorship Television Broadcasts and Counter Memory
150
We Are One Family Queerness Transnationalism and Identity Politics
174
PostCold War Celebrations
203
NOTES
207
BIBLIOGRAPHY
265
INDEX
297
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Chiou-ling Yeh is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at San Diego State University.

Bibliographic information