The Beauties of English Poetry: Selected from the Most Esteemed Authors, ... Containing Several Original Pieces, Never Before Published

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W. Spilsbury, 1804 - English poetry
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Page 53 - With store of ladies, whose bright eyes Rain influence and judge the prize Of wit or arms, while both contend To win her grace whom all commend. There let Hymen oft appear In saffron robe, with taper clear, And pomp and feast and revelry, With mask and antique pageantry, Such sights as youthful poets dream On summer eves by haunted stream.
Page 60 - Pelops' line, Or the tale of Troy divine, Or what (though rare) of later age Ennobled hath the buskined stage. But, O sad virgin, that thy power Might raise Musaeus from his bower! Or bid the soul of Orpheus sing Such notes as, warbled to the string, Drew iron tears down Pluto's cheek, And made Hell grant what Love did seek!
Page 58 - Less Philomel will deign a song, In her sweetest, saddest plight. Smoothing the rugged brow of night, While Cynthia checks her dragon yoke, Gently o'er the accustomed oak; Sweet bird, that shunn'st the noise of folly, Most musical, most melancholy!
Page 60 - Canace to wife That owned the virtuous ring and glass, And of the wondrous horse of brass On which the Tartar King did ride; And if aught else great Bards beside In sage and solemn tunes have sung Of turneys, and of trophies hung, Of forests, and enchantments drear, Where more is meant than meets the ear.
Page 48 - Hence, loathed Melancholy, Of Cerberus and blackest Midnight born In Stygian cave forlorn 'Mongst horrid shapes, and shrieks, and sights unholy ! Find out some uncouth cell, Where brooding Darkness spreads his jealous wings...
Page 53 - When in one night, ere glimpse of morn, His shadowy flail hath threshed the corn That ten day-labourers could not end; Then lies him down, the lubber fiend, And, stretched out all the chimney's length, Basks at the fire his hairy strength; And crop-full out of doors he flings, Ere the first cock his matin rings.
Page 58 - Far from all resort of mirth, Save the cricket on the hearth, Or the bellman's drowsy charm To bless the doors from nightly harm.
Page 56 - But hail, thou goddess sage and holy, Hail, divinest Melancholy! Whose saintly visage is too bright To hit the sense of human sight, And therefore to our weaker view...
Page 99 - She next the stately Bull implored ; And thus replied the mighty lord: "Since every beast alive can tell That I sincerely wish you well ; I may, without offence, pretend To take the freedom of a friend. Love calls me hence ; a favourite cow Expects me near yon barley-mow; And when a lady's in the case, You know all other things give place. To leave you thus might seem unkind, But see, the Goat is just behind.
Page 21 - And live there men who slight immortal fame ? Who then with incense shall adore our name ? But, mortals ! know, 'tis still our greatest pride To blaze those virtues which the good would hide. Rise ! Muses, rise ! add all your tuneful breath ; These must not sleep in darkness and in death.

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