Memoirs of the life of Mary queen of Scots

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1823
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Page 95 - ... we might pass to heaven with all this gay gear. But fie upon that knave Death, that will come whether we will or not ; and when he has laid on his arrest, the foul worms will be busy with this flesh, be it never so fair and so tender ; and the silly soul, I fear, shall be so feeble that it can neither carry with it gold, garnishing, targatting, pearl, nor precious stones.
Page 62 - ye have taught the people to receive another religion than their princes can allow ; and how can that doctrine be of God, seeing that God commands subjects to obey their princes...
Page 99 - weary here, return home to Edinburgh, and keep your gravity and great embassade until the Queen come thither ; for I assure you, you shall not get her here, nor I know not myself where she is become ; you see neither cloth of estate, nor such appearance that you may think there is a queen here ; nor I would not that you should think that I am she at St. Andrews, that I was at Edinburgh.
Page 94 - Oh, fair ladies, how pleasant were this life of yours if it should ever abide, and then in the end that we might pass to heaven with all this gay gear. But fie upon that knave Death, that will come whether we will or not...
Page 277 - Scottish accent, and a searching wit, clouded with mildness. Fame might move some to relieve her, and glory joined to gain might stir others to adventure much for her sake.
Page 172 - That if his resolution proceeded from discontent, they were earnest to know what persons had afforded an occasion for the same ? that if he could complain of any of the subjects of the realm, be they of what quality soever, the fault should be immediately repaired to his satisfaction. And here...
Page 46 - ... for in the memory of man, that day of the year, was never seen a more dolorous face of the heaven than was at her arrival, which two days after did so continue. For, besides the surface...
Page 34 - D'Osell." She then continued, " There is nothing Monsieur 1'Ambassadeur, doth more grieve me, than that I did so forget myself, as to require of the Queen, your mistress, that favour which I had no need to ask. I needed no more to have made her privy to my journey than she doth me of hers. I may pass well enough home into...
Page 60 - that learned men in all ages have had their judgments free, and most commonly disagreeing from the common judgment of the world; such also have they published by pen and tongue; and yet notwithstanding they themselves have lived in the common society with others, and have borne patiently with the errors and imperfections which they could not amend.
Page 94 - I can scarcely well abide the tears of mine own boys, whom my own hands correct, much less can I rejoice in your Majesty's weeping; But seeing I have offered unto you no just occasion to be offended, but have spoken the truth, as my vocation craves of me, I must sustain your Majesty's tears, rather than I dare hurt my conscience, or betray the Commonwealth by silence.

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