The Guardian, Volume 1

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T. Gillet, 1797
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Page 352 - Here will I hold. If there's a power above us — And that there is, all nature cries aloud Through all her works — He must delight in virtue; And that which He delights in must be happy.
Page 325 - Look round the habitable world, how few Know their own good, or knowing it pursue.
Page 470 - But be sure they are qualities which your patron would be thought to have ; and, to prevent any...
Page 303 - The beauty of Israel is slain upon thy high places : how are the mighty fallen ! Tell it not in Gath, publish it not in the streets of Askelon ; lest the daughters of the Philistines rejoice, lest the daughters of the uncircumcised triumph.
Page 262 - There is none greater in this house than I ; neither hath he kept back any thing from me but thee, because thou art his wife : how then can I do this great wickedness, and sin against God...
Page 288 - I use the foregoing natural maxim (viz. That he is the true possessor of a thing who enjoys it, and not he that owns it without the enjoyment of it) to convince myself that I have a property in the gay part of all the gilt chariots that I meet, which I regard as amusements designed to delight my eyes, and the imagination of those kind people who sit in them gaily attired only to please me.
Page 363 - We should find it hard to vindicate the destroying of any thing that has life, merely out of wantonness ; yet in this principle our children are bred up, and one of the...
Page 303 - Ye mountains of Gilboa, let there be no dew, neither let there be rain, upon you, nor fields of offerings : for there the shield of the mighty is vilely cast away, the shield of Saul, as though he had not been anointed with oil.
Page 63 - As it is necessary to have the head clear, as well as the complexion, to be perfect in this part of learning, I rarely mingle with the men (for I abhor wine), but frequent the tea-tables of the ladies. I know every part of their dress, and can name all their things by their names.
Page 25 - ... to be found in the world. This morning, when one of Lady Lizard's daughters was looking over some hoods and ribands, brought by her tire-woman with great care and diligence, I employed no less in examining the box which contained them...

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