The Vision of God

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., 2007 - Religion - 164 pages
Known for his deeply mystical writings about Christianity, Nicholas of Cusa wrote this, his most popular work, against a backdrop of widespread Church corruption. God, he believed, is found in all things, and thus cannot be perceived by man's senses and intellect alone. The path to ultimate knowledge, then, begins in recognizing our own ignorance. Deeply influenced by Saint Augustine, Nicholas mixes the metaphysical with the personal to create a deeply felt work, first published in 1453, designed to restore faith in even the most jaded. A German cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, NICHOLAS OF CUSA (1401-1464) was a philosopher, jurist, mathematician, and astronomer. Also referred to as Nicolaus Cusanus and Nicholas of Kues, he is considered one of the great geniuses and polymaths of the 15th century. Among his other works are Writings on Church and Reform, Catholic Concordance, and Of Learned Ignorance.
 

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Contents

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Page 3 - If I strive in human fashion to transport you to things divine, I must needs use a comparison of some kind. Now among men's works I have found no image better suited to our purpose than that of an image which is omnivoyant — its face, by the painter's cunning art, being made to appear as though looking on all around it.
Page 4 - ... the figure of an omnivoyant, and this I call the icon of God. This picture, brethren, ye shall set up in some place, let us say, on a north wall, and shall stand round it, a little way off, and look upon it. And each of you shall find that, from whatsoever quarter he regardeth it, it looketh upon him as if it looked on none other. And it shall seem to a brother standing to eastward as if that face looketh toward the east, while one to southward shall think it looketh toward the south, and one...
Page 16 - By this I can either enlarge or restrict my capacity for Thy grace. The enlarging is by conformity with Thee, when I strive to be good because Thou art good, to be just because Thou art just, to be merciful because Thou art merciful; when all my endeavour is turned toward Thee because all Thy endeavour is turned toward me; when I look unto Thee alone with all my attention, nor ever turn aside the eyes of my mind, because Thou dost enfold me with Thy constant regard; when I direct my love toward Thee...
Page 12 - God sight, hearing, taste, smell, touch, sense, reason and intellect, and so forth, according unto the divers significations of each word, yet in Him sight is not other than hearing, or tasting, or smelling, or touching, or feeling, or understanding. And so all Theology is said to be stablished in a circle, because any one of His attributes is affirmed of another, and to have...

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