Blankets: an illustrated novel

Front Cover
Top Shelf, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 582 pages
111 Reviews
At 592 pages, Blankets may well be the single largest graphic novel ever published without being serialized first. Wrapped in the landscape of a blustery Wisconsin winter, Blankets explores the sibling rivalry of two brothers growing up in the isolated country, and the budding romance of two coming-of-age lovers. A tale of security and discovery, of playfulness and tragedy, of a fall from grace and the origins of faith. A profound and utterly beautiful work from Craig Thompson. The New Printing corrects 3 small typos, widening the spine graphics, but otherwise is identical to the first printing.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
63
4 stars
30
3 stars
14
2 stars
4
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - liso - LibraryThing

Trying to describe this book leaves me grasping at single-word sentences. Beautiful. Touching. Powerful. It perfectly captures the magic of a first love, and lovingly documents a coming of age. It's a delicate, caring, story that is well worth your time. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - klburnside - LibraryThing

Another illustrated novel that I really enjoyed. I read it in two sittings, and while doing dishes between the two sittings, I couldn't stop thinking about the characters. In the few illustrated ... Read full review

All 7 reviews »

Contents

I
8
II
130
III
226

4 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

References to this book

About the author (2003)

Craig Thompson was made in Michigan in 1975, but risen up in Wisconsin and he drawed this very here book after departin' for Portland, Oregon, in 1997 and missing likewise his chums and girl-buddies.
He's mostest beknown for his best-sold graphical novel book "Blankets" -- to be winning also three Harvey Awards and two Ignatz Awards. Translationized into thirteen -- count 'em -- languages, lands like Morocco and Switzerland and Phoenix, but he's plopped hisself settled-like in Portland. For the being-time.