Ethnobotany of Western Washington

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University of Washington Press, 1973 - Science - 71 pages
2 Reviews

Since its original publication in 1945, this small classic has acquired a new audience concerned with living in harmony with the environment and interested in the particularly intimate relationship of Native Americans to the land. This survey of the use of plants by Native Americans in western Washington describes the ways in which more than 150 species served as food and medicine, and were used for the manufacture of clothes and other objects.

 

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Review: Ethnobotany of Western Washington: the Knowledge and Use of Indigenous Plants by Native Americans (Publications in Anthropology Series: No. X)

User Review  - Erin - Goodreads

Love this book! Very informative Read full review

Review: Ethnobotany of Western Washington: the Knowledge and Use of Indigenous Plants by Native Americans (Publications in Anthropology Series: No. X)

User Review  - Shawn - Goodreads

a wonderful collection of uses of local plants from regional peoples, this book is the kinda book that makes you wish you were around to conduct the orginal research. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
7
The Plants and Their Uses
13
Additions to the Quileute Entries
51
Illustrations
57
Bibliography
65
Copyright

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About the author (1973)

The late Dr. Erna Gunther was a professor of anthropology and director of the Washington State Museum at the University of Washington in Seattle. Her research of the native people of the Pacific Northwest spanned six decades.

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