Life Between Death and Rebirth: Sixteen Lectures

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Anthroposophic Press, 1968 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 308 pages
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16 lectures, various cities, Oct. 26, 1912 - May 13, 1913 (CW 140)In these lectures Steiner deals with the experiences of the human soul during and after death. On the basis of precise clairvoyant observations, he describes the events experienced during the millennium of the soul s journey within the vast realms of soul and spirit between death and rebirth. Steiner describes the states of consciousness experienced by our deceased loved ones and how we by considering their new consciousness can communicate with them and even help them. Reading these descriptions, it becomes clear that excarnated souls need the spiritual support of those presently incarnated, and that those still on earth, in turn, derive enlightenment and support from their former earthly companions. Contents:
  • Investigations into Life between Death and Rebirth, Milan, Oct. 26 27, 1912 (2 lectures)
  • Man s Journey through the Planetary Spheres & the Significance of a Knowledge of Christ, Hanover, Nov. 3, 1912
  • Recent Results of Occult Investigation into Life between Death and Rebirth, Vienna, Nov. 3, 1912
  • Life between Death and Rebirth, Munich, Nov. 26 28, 1912 (2 lectures)
  • The Working of Karma in Life after Death, Bern, Dec. 15, 1912
  • Between Death and a New Birth, Vienna, Jan. 26, 1913
  • Life after Death, Linz, Jan. 26, 1913
  • Anthroposophy as the Quickener of Feeling and of Life, Tubingen, Feb. 16, 1913
  • The Mission of Earthly Life As a Transitional Stage for the Beyond, Frankfurt, March 2, 1913
  • Life between Death and Rebirth, Munich, March 10 12, 1913 (2 lectures)
  • Further Facts about Life between Death and Rebirth, Breslau, April 5, 1913
  • Intercourse with the Dead, Dusseldorf, April 27, 1913
  • Life after Death, Strasbourg, May 13, 1913 German edition titled: "Occulte Untersuchungen uber das Leben zwischen Tod und neuer Geburt""Life between Death and Rebirth" is a translation of 16 lectures from "Okkulte Untersuchungen uber das Leben zwischen Tod und neuer Geburt. Die lebendige Wechselwirkung zwischen Leben und Tod" (CW 140)"
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    Review: Life Between Death and Rebirth

    User Review  - Goodreads

    For reasons indicated here: http://corjesusacratissimum.org/2011/... ... I do not even want to rate this book. My views on Steiner are so complex and so likely to be misunderstood that I would rather ... Read full review

    Review: Life Between Death and Rebirth

    User Review  - Mervyn Caplan - Goodreads

    brilliant One of the experiences after death that we have is experiencing the pain and joy we gave to others. Read full review

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    About the author (1968)

    Austrian-born Rudolf Steiner was a noted Goethe (see Vol. 2) scholar and private student of the occult who became involved with Theosophy in Germany in 1902, when he met Annie Besant (1847--1933), a devoted follower of Madame Helena P. Blavatsky (1831--1891). In 1912 he broke with the Theosophists because of what he regarded as their oriental bias and established a system of his own, which he called Anthroposophy (anthro meaning "man"; sophia sophia meaning "wisdom"), a "spiritual science" he hoped would restore humanism to a materialistic world. In 1923 he set up headquarters for the Society of Anthroposophy in New York City. Steiner believed that human beings had evolved to the point where material existence had obscured spiritual capacities and that Christ had come to reverse that trend and to inaugurate an age of spiritual reintegration. He advocated that education, art, agriculture, and science be based on spiritual principles and infused with the psychic powers he believed were latent in everyone. The world center of the Anhthroposophical Society today is in Dornach, Switzerland, in a building designed by Steiner. The nonproselytizing society is noted for its schools.

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