The Manambu Language of East Sepik, Papua New Guinea

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OUP Oxford, Jun 17, 2010 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 732 pages
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This book is the first comprehensive description of the Manambu language of Papua New Guinea and is based entirely on the author's immersion fieldwork. Manambu belongs to the Ndu language family, and is spoken by about 2,500 people in five villages: Avatip, Yawabak, Malu, Apa:n, and Yambon (Yuanab) in East Sepik Province, Ambunti district. Manambu can be considered an endangered language. The Manambu language has many unusual properties. Every noun is considered masculine or feminine. Feminine gender - which is unmarked - is associated with small size and round shape, and masculine gender with elongated shape, large size, and importance. The Manambu culture is centered on ownership of personal names, and is similar to that of the Iatmul, described by Gregory Bateson. After an introductory account of the language and its speakers, Professor Aikhenvald devotes chapters to phonology, grammatical relations, word classes, gender, semantics, number, case, possession, derivation and compounding, pronouns, morphohology, verbs, mood and modality, negation, clause structure, pragmatics, discourse, semantics, the lexicon, current directions of change, and genetic relationship to other languages. The description is presented in a clear style in a framework that will be comprehensible to all linguists and linguistically oriented anthropologists.
 

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Contents

The Language and its Speakers
1
2 Phonology
36
3 Grammatical Relations
61
4 Word Classes
71
5 Gender Marking Semantics and Agreement
112
6 Number
130
7 Case Marking
144
8 Possession
168
15 Verb Compounding
338
16 Directionals and ValencyChanging Devices
377
17 Complex Predicates
424
18 Clause Linking and Dependent Clauses
446
19 Other Dependent Clauses and Further Features of Clause Linking
466
20 Clause Types and DiscoursePragmatic Devices
507
21 Issues in Semantics and Features of Lexicon
551
22 Genetic and Areal Relationships and New Developments in the Language
591

9 Derivation and Compounding
179
10 Closed Classes
197
11 Predicate Structure and Verb Root Types
244
12 Verbal Categories in Positive Declarative and Interrogative Clauses
254
13 Mood and Modality
276
14 Negation
298
Texts
627
Vocabulary
665
List of Affixes
676
References
679
Index of Authors Languages and Subjects
689
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald is Professor and Research Leader (People and Societies of the Tropics) in the Cairns Institute, James Cook University, Australia. She has worked on descriptive and historical aspects of Berber languages and has published, in Russian, a grammar of Modern Hebrew (1990; second edition 2009). She is a major authority on languages of the Arawak family, from northern Amazonia, and has written grammars of Bare (1995, based on work with the last speaker who has since died) and Warekena (1998), plus A Grammar of Tariana, from Northwest Amazonia (Cambridge University Press, 2003), in addition to essays on various typological and areal features of South American languages. Other books include Classifiers: a Typology of Noun Categorization Devices (2000, paperback 2003), Language Contact in Amazonia (2002) and Evidentiality (2004, paperback 2006), all published by OUP. She is co-editor with R. M. W. Dixon of the OUP series Explorations in Linguistic Typology, the fifth volume of which, The Semantics of Clause Linking, appeared in 2009.