Communications & Social Order Ppr

Front Cover
Transaction Publishers - Language Arts & Disciplines - 475 pages
In this highly influential study of art forms as models for a theory of communications, Hugh Dalziel Duncan demonstrates that without understanding of the role of symbols in society, social scientists cannot hope to develop adequate models for social analysis. He reviews critically major contributions to communication theory during the past century: Freud's analysis of dream symbolism, Simmel's concept of sociability, James' insights into religious experience, and Dewey's relating of art to experience.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Social Order as a Form of Hierarchy
253
SOCIAL PASSAGE
257
THE PRESENTATION OF SOCIAL ROLES AND SOCIAL ROLES AS A FORM OF HIERARCHY
262
MANNERS AND SOCIAL ORDER
266
The Communication of Hierarchy
271
HIERARCHAL IDENTIFICATION
273
THE DEPENDENCE OF TOLERATION OF DIFFERENCES ON THE COMMUNICATION OF TRANSCENDENT PRINCIPLES OF SOCIAL ORDER
278
HOW ORDER AND DISORDER DEFINE EACH OTHER
280

SIMMELS CONTRIBUTION TO SOCIAL THEORY CONSIDERED IN TERMS OF COMMUNICATION
28
MalinowskisTheory of the Social Context of Magical Language
34
LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL ORGANIZATION
37
THE RELEVANCE OF MALINOWSKIs TRIBAL CONTEXT OF SITUATION TO COMMUNICATION IN MODERN SOCIETY
40
The Self and Society as Determined by Communication in JamesDewey and Mead
47
Society As Determined by Communication Deweys Theory of Art as Communication
49
HIS VIEWS ON HUMAN DOCUMENTS
52
COMMUNICATION ART AND SOCIETY IN DEWEY
55
DEWEYS CONTRIBUTIONS TO A SOCIAL THEORY OF COMMUNICATION
63
DEWEYS VIEW OF THE SOCIAL FUNCTION OF ART
66
Communication and the Emergence of the Self in the Work of George Herbert Mead
73
THE EMERGENCE OF THE SELF IN COMMUNICATION
76
THE SELF AND THE OTHER IN COMMUNICATION
78
The Final Phase of the Act Consummation
82
THE FUNCTION OF IMAGERY IN CONDUCT
87
The Problem of Form in Meads Theory of the Significant Symbol
92
PROBLEMS IN THE USE OF MEADS CONCEPT OF ROLETAKING
96
THE ORGANIZATION OF PERSPECTIVES AND COMMUNICATION AS A FORM OF ADDRESS
100
The Function of Symbols in Society an Application of Burkes Dramatistic View of Social Relationships
107
Burkes Dramatistic View of Society
109
THE NATURE OF SYMBOLIC ACTION IN SOCIETY
114
Social Order Considered as a Drama of Redemption Through Victimage
121
REDEMPTION AND VICTIMAGE IN SOCIAL ORDER
125
HOW VICTIMAGE FUNCTIONS IN SOCIETY
129
THE PERFECTING OF VICTIMACE IN SOCIETY
131
Burkes Sociology of Language
141
The Structure and Function of the Act in the Work of Kenneth Burke
143
LOGICAL RHETORICAL AND SYMBOLIC PHASES OF THE ACT
147
A Rhetoric of Motives Burkes Sociology of Language
154
IDENTIFICATION IN RHETORIC
158
The Rhetoric of Social Order
165
PERSUASION AND COMMUNICATION
170
Social Mystification in Communication Between Classes
177
Toward a New Rhetoric Burkes Analysis of Social Mystification in Bentham and Marx
179
RHETORIC AND DIALECTIC IN MARXISM
181
MARXISM CONSIDERED AS A RHETORICAL CRITIQUE
185
Social Mystification and Social Integration
190
IRONY AND RHETORIC
194
Reason and Hierarchal Disorganization
202
DIDEROT ON THE VILE PANTOMIME OF ARISTOCRATIC HIERARCHY
204
LA ROCHEFOUCAULD ON COURTLY ADDRESS
207
The Rhetoric of Ruling Communication and Authority
212
THE RHETORIC OF DOMINATION OF THE SECULAR WORLD BY THE DEVOUT CHRIDTIAN GRACIANS THE ART OF WORLDLY WISD...
217
Rhetoric as an Instrument of Domination Through Unreason Hitlers Mein Kampf
225
THE STAGING OF APPEALS TO MASS AUDIENCES
229
Social Order Based on Unreason The Perversion of Religion by the State
238
HTILERS RHETORIC AS ALLEGORY
241
POLITICAL ACTION AS TRAGIC RITUAL DRAMA
245
A Sociological Model of Social Order as Determined by the Communication of Hierarchy
251
ART CONSIDERED AS THE GUARDIAN OF SOCIAL ORDER
282
Hicrarchal Address
288
A TYPOLOGY OF AUDIENCES DETERMINED BY HIERARCHAL ADDRESS
292
THE GENERAL PUBLIC
294
THE AUDIENCE AS THE CONSCIENCE OF THE COMMUNITY
295
INDIVIDUALS AS AUDIENCE TO EACH OTHER
297
A Sociological View of Inner Audiences
302
MORTIFICATION AND GUILT
306
THE SOCIAL FUNCTION OF SOLILOQUY
310
Hierarchal Transcendence and Social Bonds
313
Social Transcendence
315
SOCIAL PROGRESSION
319
SOCIAL MYSTIFICATION AND THE PERFECTION OF HIERAiCHY
321
Equality and Social Order
326
PLAY AND SOCIATION
328
THE SOCIAL FUNCTION OF THE GENTLEMAN
331
PLAY AND EQUALITY
334
HIERARCHY AND EQUALITY
337
AUTHORITY AND VICTIMACE
339
THE RESOLUTION OF HATE AND LOVE AMONG EQUALS
343
The Establishment of Money as a Symbol of Community Life
347
THE FREUDIAN SYMBOL OF MONEY
351
SIMMEL AND VEBLEN
353
THE SHIFT FROM THE PURITAN ETHIC OF EARNING TO AN ETHIC OF SPENDING
355
Money as a Form of Transcendence in American Life
358
SPENDING AND DEATH
360
THE DEIFICATION OF THE BUSINESSMAN
362
AMERICAN ART AND THE DIGNIFICATION OF SPENDING
364
The Social Function of Art Society
371
Comedy and Social Integration
373
COMEDY AND SOCIAL CONTROL
376
THE SOCIAL FUNCTION OF IRONY
380
COMEDY AND GROUP IDENTIFICATION
387
The Comic Scapegoat
393
COMIC VICTIMAGE AND SOCIAL CATHARSIS
395
COMEDY AND THE SELF
402
Comedy as the Rhetoric of Reason in Society
406
THE SOCIAL FUNCTION OF COMIC OBSCENITY
407
COMIC UNMASKING
411
COMEDY AND THE PURIFICATION OF SOCIAL ORDER
413
Tragic and Comic Sexual Themes Compared
417
COMIC AND TRAGIC COMMUNICATION OF SEX
420
SEXUAL AND SOCIAL GUILT IN COMEDY
424
By Way of Conclusion
429
A Sociological Model of Social Interaction as Determined by Communication
431
THE STRUCTURE OF THE SYMBOLIC ACT
433
THE FUNCTION OF THE SYMBOLIC ACT
436
Index
439
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information