To Possess the Land: A Biography of Arthur Rochford Manby

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Swallow Press, 1993 - Biography & Autobiography - 287 pages
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Ambitious and only 24 years old, Arthur Manby arrived from England in the Territory of New Mexico in 1883, and saw in its wilderness an empire that he believed himself destined to rule. For his kingdom, he chose a vast Spanish land grant near Taos, a wild 100,000 acres whose ancient title was beyond question. Obsessed, he poured more than 20 years into his dream of glory, and schemed, stole, lied, cajoled, begged, and bribed to take the vast grant from its rightful owners. With great mastery, Waters draws us into this obsession, and the intense drama of these years is at once psychological and historical. In May 1913, Manby came at last to possess the grant, but within three years it had slipped again from his grasp.

The story does not end there, and perhaps only Frank Waters could have portrayed the strange disintegration of Manby's personality as he aged, his frantic but ingenious efforts to regain "his" land. Among these was the creation of a secret society which terrorized whole towns and villages, becoming so powerful that even Manby no longer knew all its members and workings. At the same time he turned deeper inward, locked and bolted his gates against the outside world which hated and feared him more than ever. On July 3, 1929, a swollen, headless body was discovered in Manby's Taos home. Some said it was murder; others swore the body was not Manby's; still others reported seeing him alive afterward. The story blazed into national headlines and an official inquiry followed. Step by step, Waters takes us into the web of strange clues, evidence, more murders and complications--an investigation which the New Mexican government inexplicably called to a halt. The case remains the West's greatest unsolved mystery.

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Contents

The Folly
121
The Mystery
218
Notes
261
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Frank Waters was born in July 1902 in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He is an author of novels and historical works about the American Southwest. His first novel after college was entitled Fever Pitch (1930). He then wrote a series of autobiographical novels beginning with The Wild Earth's Nobility (1935). In 1936, Waters left L.A. and moved back and forth between Colorado and New Mexico, continuing to write and completing a biography of W. S. Stratton, Midas of the Rockies. When World War II broke out, Waters moved to Washington, D.C. to work for the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs. There, he performed the duties of a propaganda analyst and chief content officer. Waters' masterpiece, The Man Who Killed the Deer, was published in 1942. In 1953, Waters was awarded the Taos Artists Award for Notable Achievement in the Art of Writing. Waters also held positions as information consultant for Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, New Mexico. He established the Frank Waters Foundation in 1993 which is a nonprofit organization with the goal of promoting the arts, specifically those in the spirit of the creativity of Frank Waters. The members of the FWF operate under the motto "Sheltering the creative spirit", by providing a retreat for artists to live and work among the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Frank Waters died at his home in Arroyo Seco on June 3, 1995.

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