Augustine: Ancient Thought Baptized

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Cambridge University Press, 1994 - Philosophy - 334 pages
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The aim of this work is to show how Augustine adapted a deeply Platonic outlook to the new world of Christianity, and how he constructed a vision in which Platonism and Christianity pointed in the same direction. Augustine is skillfully contextualized, while the enduring, if often unpopular, power of his claims on a variety of topics is discussed in a manner that puts a fresh perspective on some of his chief concerns. These include: divine and human love; marriage and sexuality; the lust for power; and God's providence and omnipotence.
 

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Contents

Words signs and things
23
Certainty belief and understanding
41
Soul body and personal identity
92
Will love and right action
148
Individuals social institutions and political life
207
Evil justice and divine omnipotence
256
Augustinus redivivus
290
Porphyrys account of the sentence in
314
Index of modern authors
328
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