The Earth and Its Inhabitants, Africa: North-west Africa

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D. Appleton, 1895 - Africa
 

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Page 366 - Patagonia frequently cross before my eyes; yet these plains are pronounced by all wretched and useless. They can be described only by negative characters: without habitations, without water, without trees, without mountains, they support merely a few dwarf plants. Why then — and the case is not peculiar to myself — have these arid wastes taken so firm a hold on my memory...
Page 367 - Darwin, seems so remote to the naturalist — those desolate regions have ceased to be impracticable, and, although still uninhabited and uninhabitable, except to a few nomads, they are no longer unknown. During the last twenty years the country has been crossed in various directions, from the Atlantic to the Andes, and from the Rio Negro to the Straits of Magellan, and has been found all barren. The mysterious illusive city, peopled by whites, which was long believed to exist in the unknown interior,...
Page 416 - The other kind differs only in having three balls united by the thongs to a common centre. The Gaucho holds the smallest of the three in his hand, and whirls the other two round and round his head; then, taking aim, sends them like chain shot revolving through the air. The balls no sooner strike any object, than, winding round it, they cross each other, and become firmly hitched.
Page 465 - ... as injurious to the fruit-trees. Although in recent years tillage has encroached on pasturage, just as sheepfarming has been developed at the expense of cattle-breeding, the Argentine provinces of Entre-Rios and Buenos Ayres, together with the conterminous Republic of Uruguay, still possess more cattle and horses in proportion to the population than any other region of the globe. In respect of sheep they rival, and, in some districts, greatly outstrip Australia itself. AGRICULTURE. Agriculture...
Page 367 - Patagonia the monotony of the plains, or expanse of low hills, the universal unrelieved greyness of everything, and the absence of animal forms and objects new to the eye, leave the mind open and free to receive an impression of visible nature as a whole. One gazes on the prospect as on the sea, for it stretches away sea-like, without change, into infinitude; but without the sparkle of water, the changes of hue which shadows and sunlight and nearness and distance give, and motion of waves and white...
Page 367 - Patagonia are boundless, for they are scarcely passable, and hence unknown; they bear the stamp of having lasted, as they are now, for ages, and there appears no limit to their duration through future time. If, as the ancients supposed, the flat earth was surrounded by an impassable breadth of water, or by deserts heated to an intolerable excess, who would not look at these last boundaries to man's knowledge with deep but ill-defined sensations ? Lastly, of natural scenery, the views from lofty mountains,...
Page 408 - ... rivers that the white man knows not of. When Indians on expeditions of this nature come across a solitary white man, they kill him if they find arms upon him. If he be unarmed, they treat him more mercifully. They content themselves with cutting off the soles of his feet, and let him go.
Page 400 - ... no room for doubt. All that I had previously heard had compelled me to believe that the puma really does possess a unique instinct of friendliness for man, the origin of which, like that of many other well-known instincts of animals, must remain a mystery.
Page 401 - The fact that the puma never makes an unprovoked attack on a human being, or eats human flesh, and that it refuses, except in some very rare cases, even to defend itself, does not seem really less wonderful in an animal of its bold and sanguinary temper than that it should follow the traveller in the wilderness, or come near him when he lies sleeping or disabled, and even occasionally defend him from its enemy the jaguar. We know that certain sounds, colours, or smells, which are not particularly...
Page 164 - D'Orbigny states that they wore collars or strings of the teeth of the persons they had eaten, and the portrait of a woman so ornamented is figured in Sir W. Ouseley's

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