Indo-Muslim Cultures in Transition

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Alka Patel, Karen Leonard
BRILL, Nov 25, 2011 - History - 279 pages
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The authors in this volume explore Indo-Muslim cultures developing in South Asia from the sixteenth through twentieth centuries, sharing central themes but showing significant contextual variations by time and place. They focus a much-needed analytical gaze on the rich layers of circulation and exchange of art, architecture, and literature within South Asia and testify to the interaction of Muslims and Islamic traditions with other people and traditions in India for centuries.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Ethnography or Trope?
17
A Reexamination of Bijapuri masterpieces through the lens of the Lucknow copy
37
The New Urdu Vogue Meets Krishna Bhakti
61
the many facets of the Mughal imperial image after Shah Jahan as seen in the exBinney collection in the San Diego Museum of Art
87
From Miniatures to Monuments Picturing Shah Alams Delhi 17711806
111
Mercantile Architectural Patronage in Hyderabad late 18th19th Centuries
139
Old City Neighborhoods in the Nineteenth Century
165
INTERROGATING THE EAST CULTURE AND LOSS IN ABDUL HALIM SHARARʾS Guzashta Lakhnaʾu
189
DISSENTING VIEWS ON THE EARLY YEARS OF THE PROGRESSIVE MOVEMENT IN URDU LITERATURE
205
Index
219
Color Plates
221
Black and White Plates
252
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Alka Patel, PhD (Harvard 2000) is Associate Professor of South Asian Art, University of California, Irvine. Her publications explore Indian Ocean material history and 12th- through 16th-century architecture in northern India. Her current interests include Ghurid (late 12th century) architecture, and a collaborative investigation of Hyderabad's merchant-bankers. Karen Isaksen Leonard earned a Ph.D. in History from the University of Wisconsin in 1969 and now chairs the Anthropology Department at the University of California, Irvine. She has published on the history of Hyderabad, India, and Hyderabadis abroad, South Asian immigrants to the United States, and Muslim Americans.

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