Drifting House

Front Cover
Penguin, Feb 2, 2012 - Fiction - 224 pages
3 Reviews
An unflinching portrayal of the Korean immigrant experience from an extraordinary new talent in fiction.

Spanning Korea and the United States, from the postwar era to contemporary times, Krys Lee's stunning fiction debut, Drifting House, illuminates a people torn between the traumas of their collective past and the indignities and sorrows of their present.

In the title story, children escaping famine in North Korea are forced to make unthinkable sacrifices to survive. The tales set in America reveal the immigrants' unmoored existence, playing out in cramped apartments and Koreatown strip malls. A makeshift family is fractured when a shaman from the old country moves in next door. An abandoned wife enters into a fake marriage in order to find her kidnapped daughter.

In the tradition of Chang-rae Lee's Native Speaker and Jhumpa Lahiri's Interpreter of Maladies, Drifting House is an unforgettable work by a gifted new writer.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - A_Reader_of_Fictions - LibraryThing

Drifting House consists of nine short stories. All of them focus on Koreans or Korean-Americans. The topics of each short story vary greatly, as do the time in which they're set (from the 1970s to ... Read full review

DRIFTING HOUSE

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Affecting stories about the conflicts between Korean and American culture.Lee tends to focus on domestic relationships, the tensions—sometimes unbridgeable—between husband and wife, between parent ... Read full review

Contents

A TEMPORARY MARRIAGE
AT THE EDGE OF THE WORLD
THE PASTORS
THE GOOSE FATHER
THE SALARYMAN
DRIFTING HOUSE
THE BELIEVER
BEAUTIFUL WOMEN
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

Krys Lee was born in Seoul, South Korea, raised in California and Washington, and studied in the United States and England. She was a finalist for Best New American Voices, received a special mention in the 2012 Pushcart Prize XXXVI, and her work has appeared in the Kenyon Review, Narrative magazine, Granta (New Voices), California Quarterly, Asia Weekly, The Guardian, The New Statesman, and Condé Nast Traveller, UK (forthcoming). She lives in Seoul with intervals in San Francisco.
www.kryslee.com

Bibliographic information