SECRET HISTORY OF THE FRENCH COURT UNDER RICHELIEU AND MAZARIN

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Page 9 - The new Duchess de Chevreuse had been appointed superintendent of -the queen's household during the life-time of her first husband, and had soon become the favorite of Anne of Austria as the constable was the favorite of Louis XIII. The court at that time was very brilliant, and gallantry the order of the day. Marie de Rohan was naturally gay and spirited. She yielded to the allurements of youth and pleasure. She had lovers, and these lovers forced her into politics. Retz himself admits this in the...
Page 163 - Turenne, Bouillon's own brother, solicited the honor of serving him, and the Duke d'Enghien gained him battle after battle. She knew that the cardinal held proofs within his hands which could condemn and imprison her during her whole life. But when all abandoned her, this extraordinary woman did not abandon herself. As soon as the officer Riquetti had signified to her the order of which he was the bearer, she took her resolution with her accustomed promptness, and accompanied by her daughter Charlotte,...
Page 6 - Moncornet, they have no resemblance to Madame de Chevreuse at any age. bazon, a zealous servant of Henri IV., Peer and Master of the Hounds, and Governor of Paris and of the Isle of France, and of his first wife, Madeleine de Lenoncourt, sister of Urbain de Laval, Marshal de Bois-Dauphin. Born almost with the seventeenth century, in December, 1600, she lost her mother at a very early age, and in 1617 espoused that audacious favorite of Louis XIII., who, on the faith of the fickle friendship of a...
Page 169 - ... the principal part in the three great resolutions which express and recapitulate the whole history of the Fronde from the battle of Paris and the peace of Ruel ; in 1650, she was of the opinion that they should prefer Mazarin to Conde, and dared to advise them to lay hands on the victor of Eocroy and of Lens ; in 1651, a moment of wavering on the part of Mazarin, who nearly lost sight of her in his own intrigues and in a too complicated policy, together with the pressure of a strong personal...
Page 2 - ... of an irresistible grace and vivacity, full of talent, yet very ignorant, sharing in all the perils of the Catholic party, but scarcely thinking of religion, too proud to condescend to prudence, and curbed only by honor, devoted to gallantry, and counting all else as nothing, despising for the one whom she loved, danger, opinion and fortune, more restless than ambitious, and willingly staking her own life, as well as that of others ; and after having passed her youth in intrigues of every sort,...
Page 150 - Mazarin musf have had with the queen at this critical juncture. These explanations probably were not such as to be so easily forgotten as to require one to keep notes of them. However, we find an obscure passage written in Spanish, from which we glean the following words : " I ought no longer to have any doubts, since the queen, in an excess of goodness, has told me that nothing can deprive me of the post near her person which she has done me the favor to give me ; notwithstanding, as fear is the...
Page 109 - She has a clear perception of every thing; she readily divines that it is I who am acting in secret on the queen to hinder her from restoring the government of Brittany to the Duke de Vendome. She has said so to her father, the Duke de Montbazon, and also to Montagu...
Page 33 - and at an age when one loves to do extraordinary and brilliant things, and I could not conceive anything more so than at the same time to carry off the Queen from the King, her husband, and from the Cardinal de Richelieu, who was jealous of her, and to take away Mile, de Hautefort from the King, who was in love with her.
Page 82 - Seeing that for great and important reasons, affecting the welfare of our service, we have been constrained to deprive the Sieur de Chateauneuf of the office of Keeper of the Seals of France, and to...
Page 86 - Fronde, when the populace attacked him on the Pont-Neuf when going to the parliament, but miration as does the fact that neither the fatigues of her long journeys, nor the ills of her rigorous fortune, have wrought any change in her natural magnanimity, nor, which is still more extraordinary, in her beauty. Behold the seeming !—-see now the reality. Madame de Chevreuse was then forty-three years of age.

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